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Full text of "The Pasquaney annual"

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EN 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRA 



3 1833 03581 9504 



'Go 974. 202 B76pa 1 922 
The Pasquaney annual 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/pasquaneyannualOObris 




ACPL 



Donated 
to THE 

Allen County Public Library 

GIFT OF 
MIKE MC CARTHY & FAMILY 
FORT WAYNE, IN 
JULY 1999 



Stye 



Pasquatunj Annual 



... of 



1022 



PUBLISHED PRIVATELY 

MUSGROVE PRINTING HOUSE 

BRISTOL. N. H. 



Allen County Public Library 

900 Webster Street 

PO Box 2270 

Fort Wayne, IN 46801-2270 



This Edition is limited to 
one hundred a?id twenty-Jive numbered copies 

This Copy is No vf 



THE APPROACH TO PA5QUANLY 




OUR "LANE BEAUTIFUL' 



THL COUNCIL, 1922 



Edward Simpson Wilson, Ph.B., Yale, 1885 
"Eastbourne Place," Bridgewater, N. H. 



Edward William Cecil Jackson, A.B., Harvard, 1902 
"Eastbourne Place," Bridgewater, N. H. 

Marshall Moore Bartholomew, Ph.B., Yale, 1907 
Bach. Mus., U. of P., 1909 
57 West 48th Street, New York City 

John Marshall Crosman, B.S., Haverford, 1918 
Haverford, Pa. 

Charles Chauncey Buell, Harvard, 1923 

21 Gray's Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 

Donald Davidson Kennedy, Princeton, 1924 
2203 Walnut Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Palmer Bankson, Jr., B.A., Yale, 1922 
Haverford, Pa. 

Leonard Tomb Davidson, A.B., Oberlin, 1912 

M.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1919 

Children's Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. 

Resident Physician 

John William Spaeth, Jr., A.B., Haverford, 1917 
A.M., Harvard, 1918 
William Penn Charter School, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Charles Cooper Townsend, Princeton, 1924 
"Raynham," Overbrook, Pa. 

Udolpho Theodore Bradley, Princeton, 1923 
300 Washington Street, Frankfort, Kentucky 

Richard Barclay Scull, A.B., Princeton, 1922 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

John Cranwill Thompson, Wesleyan, 1924 
Psi Upsilon House, Middletown, Conn. 

Vinton Chapin, Harvard, 1923 

22 Gray's Hall, Cambridge, Mass. 

Richard Arthur Kimball, B.A., Yale, 1922 
132 Elm Street, Oberlin, Ohio 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 








*jL 


V 


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^3 



SOML OF OUR 1922 SNAPSHOTS 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



The Council — Continued 

Richard Grafflin Sagebeer, A.B., Haverford, 1922 
Berwyn, Pa. 

David Alexander Watt, U. S. Engineers 
Care of Mr. E. W. C. Jackson, Bridgewater, N. H. 

William Stackhouse Scull, 2nd, Princeton, 1925 
53 Little Hall, Princeton, N. J. 

Theodore Henry Hinchman, Jr., Princeton, 1925 
1030 Van Dyke Avenue, Detroit, Mich. 

Francis Bunce Comstock, Yale, 1923 
924 Harkness Memorial Quadrangle, New Haven, Conn. 

Robert Runyon Diefendorf, Wesleyan, 1924 
Psi Upsilon House, Middletown, Conn. 



James Alexander Bovaird, Jr., U. of P., 1923 

2136 North 18th Street, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Assistant Secretary 



Dr. Frederick M. Robertson, M.D., Harvard, 1901 

Main Street, Bristol, N. H. 

Consulting Physician 



CAPTAIN5 OF INDUSTRY 



Thomas E. Hawes Appointed 1921 



Eliot Codman 


1921 


Charles C. Clarke 


1922 


Charles D. Gowing 


1922 


David B. Hinchman 


1922 


Donald Murchie 


1922 


George A. Phelps, Jr. 


1922 


Frank O. Reed 


1922 


William F. Sanford 


1922 


Herbert S. Smith 


1922 


Walter H. Lillard, Jr. 


1922 



THL BOY5, 1922 



Earle Kelly Anthony, 

Care of E. C. Anthony, Esq., 
1400 Van Ness Ave., 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Clayton French Banks, 

6320 Drexel Road, Overbrook, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Lloyd Bankson, 2nd, 
Ardmore, Pa. 

Philip Van Dyke Beckwith, 
1049 Prospect Avenue, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Roderick Beebe, Jr., 
7 Shady Hill Square, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Richard Case Berresford, 
520 West 114th Street, 
New York City. 

Edward Julius Berwind, 2nd, 
2112 Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Paul Bird, 

11 West Cedar Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Arthur Pereyz Bonney, 
66 Marshal Street, 
Brookline, Mass. 

George Wales Brewster, 
213 Beacon Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Robert Catlin Buell, Jr., 

114 Vernon Street, 

Hartford, Conn. 



John Boylston Campbell, 
26 East 60th Street, 
New York City. 

Franklin Pattison Cator, 
511 Roland Avenue, 

Roland Park, Baltimore, Md. 

Percy Chubb, 2nd, 
Llewellyn Park, 

West Orange, N. J. 

Edgar Moore Church, Jr., 
2046 Locust Street, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Charles Cushing Clarke, 
5 Lakeview Terrace, 
Winchester, Mass. 

John Allen Clarke, 
5 Lakeview Terrace, 
Winchester, Mass. 

Daniel Sargent Codman, 
3 Arlington Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Eliot Codman, 

3 Arlington Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Samuel Eliot Codman, 

3 Arlington Street, 

Boston, Mass. 

John Norman Curtis, 
5870 Drexel Road, 

Overbrook, Philadelphia, Pa. 

Stephen Davol, 

21 Hawthorne Road, 
Brookline, Mass. 



12 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Frederick Tallmadge Day, 
441 Fowler Avenue, 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Willis Scull De La Cour, 
Bank Avenue, 
River ton, N. J. 

Richard Dana deRham, 

Cold Spring-on-Hudson, N. Y. 

Robert Howard Eisenbrey, Jr., 
College Avenue, 
Haverford, Pa. 

Thomas Hopkinson Eliot, 
25 Reservoir Street, 
Cambridge, Mass. 

Joseph Fowler, 
Pondfield Court, 
Bronxville. N. Y. 

Frederic Mcintosh Galbraith, 
28 Park Street, 

Easthampton, Mass. 

Charles Chauncey Goodrich, 
61 North Beacon Street, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Charles Darrow Gowing, 

74 Monmouth Street, 

Brookline, Mass. 

Robert Bigelow Gowing, 

74 Monmouth Street, 

Brookline, Mass. 

George Huntress Grant, 
229 Culver Road, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Robert Gray, 

136 Brunswick Avenue, 
Gardiner, Me. 



Francis Appleton Harding, 
Dedham, Mass. 

John Briard Harding, 
Dedham, Mass. 

David Steele Hart, 
17 Frederick Street, 
Waterbury, Conn. 

Edmund Thatcher Hawes, 
7 Doane Street, 
Fairhaven, Mass. 

Thomas Eldridge Hawes, 
7 Doane Street, 
Fairhaven, Mass. 

Basil Duke Henning, 
943 Cherokee Road, 
Louisville, Kentucky. 

James Williamson Henning, 3rd, 
943 Cherokee Road, 
Louisville, Kentucky. 

David Ballentine Hinchman, 
1030 Van Dyke Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan. 

John Marshall Hinchman, 2nd, 
1030 Van Dyke Avenue, 
Detroit, Michigan. 

Buell Hollister, 

4 East Fifth Street, 
Corning, N. Y. 

Henry Crane Hollister, 
195 Heights Road, 
Ridgewood, N. J. 

John Howland, Jr., 

Oak Place, Charles Street, 
Baltimore, Md. 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



13 



Whitney Ford Hoyt, 

30 North Goodman Street, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Frederick Bernard Hufnagel, Jr. 
407 Quaker Road, 
Sewickley, Pa. 

Felix Turner Hughes, Jr., 
692 Colonial Avenue, 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Floyd Wellman Jefferson, Jr., 
Short Hills, N. J. 

Thomas Louis Jefferson, 
63 Mulberry Street, 
Springfield, Mass. 

Herbert Thorn King, Jr. 
Tower Hill Road, 
Tuxedo Park, N. Y. 

Albert Randell Lee, Jr., 

346 Park Avenue, 

Orange, N. J. 

Ivy Ledbetter Lee, Jr., 
4 East 66th Street, 
New York City. 

Frederick Norton Leonard, 
Morris Plains, N. J. 

James Richard Leonard, 
400 Monterey Avenue, 
Pelham Manor, N. Y. 

Ernest Douglas Levering, Jr., 
Ruxton, 

Baltimore County, Md. 

Edward Hegeler Lihme, 
1200 Lake Shore Drive, 
Chicago, 111. 



Walter Huston Lillard, Jr., 
Marion, Mass. 

Ellwood Caldwell Lindsay, Jr. 
5869 Overbrook Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Franciscus Lindsay, 
5869 Overbrook Avenue, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Carrington Mason Lloyd, 
65 Prospect Park, 
Newtonville, Mass. 

Thomas McKean, Jr., 
Haverford, Pa. 

Maurice Bursley Makepeace, 
W 7 areham, Mass. 

Edward LeBoutillier Marshall, 
St. Davids Road, 
St. Davids, Pa. 

Huntington Miller, 
243 Summit Avenue, 
St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Thruston Ballard Morton, 
Glenview, Kentucky. 

Townsend Munson, 
Latches Lane, 
Overbrook, Pa. 

Donald Murchie, 

21 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 

Guy Murchie, Jr., 

21 Commonwealth Avenue, 
Boston, Mass. 

Percy Owen, Jr., 
1791 Burns Avenue, 
Detroit, Mich. 



14 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



George Alexander Phelps, Jr., 
594 Farmington Avenue, 
Hartford, Conn. 

Nathaniel Pope, 2nd, 
10 Fort Street, 
Fairhaven, Mass. 

John Pierrepont Porter, 
Manchester, Vt. 

Edward Hyde Rakestraw, 
5917 Drexel Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

John Louis Rakestraw, 
5917 Drexel Road, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

Frank Otheman Reed, 
134 North Street, 
Auburn, N. Y. 

Edwin Winter Ritchie, 
46 Crocus Place, 

St. Paul, Minnesota. 

Leonard Jacob Sanford, 
367 Elm Street, 

New Haven, Conn. 

William Farnam Sanford, 
367 Elm Street, 
New Haven, Conn. 

Theodore Carmalt Scull, 
Bryn Mawr, Pa. 

Herbert Simonds Smith, 
45 Devon Road, 

Newton Center, Mass. 

Charles Fuller Stanwood, 
165 Main Street, 
Brunswick, Maine. 



Scott Stewart, Jr., 
10 Northern Avenue, 
Bronxville, N. Y. 

Telford Taylor, 
23 Lowell Road, 

Schenectady, N. Y. 

William Kneeland Townsend, 
18 Prescott Avenue, 
Bronxville, N. Y. 

Laurence Edward Tracy, 

46 West 51st Street, 

New York City. 

William Ward Tracy, 
46 West 51st Street, 
New York City. 

Joseph Roy Vetterlein, Jr., 

107 East Montgomery Avenue, 
Ardmore, Pa. 

James Bolton Winpenny, 2nd, 
7247 Limekiln Pike, 
Philadelphia, Pa. 

William Henry Winstead, Jr., 
Ruxton, 

Baltimore County, Md. 

Charles Francis W r ood, Jr., 
1370 Third Avenue. 
Louisville, Kentucky. 

John Gordon Harper Woodward, 
20 Sibley Place, 
Rochester, N. Y. 

Perry Edward Wurst, Jr., 
564 Lafayette Avenue, 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Walter Francis Wyeth, Jr., 
Chestnut Terrace, 

Newton Center, Mass. 



XLhc flbasquanqj Hnnual 

CONTINUATION OF 

Gbe Mbite Bircb 

(Published annually by and for the members of Camp Pasquaney) 



VOL. XXIV 



NEW SERIES 



1922 



EDITORIAL BOARD 



Edward Simpson Wilson, Chairman 
Edward W. C. Jackson, Business Manager 
John W. Spaeth, Jr., Managing Editor 
John C. Thompson, Cartoonist 



EDITORIAL STAFF 

Charles D. Gowing 
Frank O. Reed 
Donald Murchie 
Richard C. Berresford 
William F. Sanford 



BUSINESS STAFF 

A. Randell Lee, Jr. 
James W. Henning, 3rd 
Philip Van D. Beckwith 
Townsend Munson 



EDITORIALS 



Another season, the Twenty- 
eighth, has added its toll of achieve- 
ment to the growing fund of Pas- 
quaney tradition. Few words are 
needed to characterize this season : 
for it no apologetic phrases are 
necessary. It has been, in very 
truth, a record of earnest endeavor, 
steady progress, and successful at- 
tainment. 

Starting at the opening of Camp 
with a larger enrollment than ever 
before, with a large number of new 



boys, and with a staff of Captains of 
Industry who, with two exceptions, 
were inexperienced in their posi- 
tions of trust and responsibility, 
Pasquaney faced an outcome for 
the season of 1922 that was, at least, 
problematical. The one rock of 
surety seemed to be the veteran 
council which Mr. Ned had gath- 
ered about him for the summer. In 
his choice of this body of men he 
was not to be disappointed, for 
their whole-hearted support and 



i6 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



fine spirit of co-operation could 
hardly have been better. Their 
most effective work was done at the 
start, in organizing anew the camp 
routine and in fanning to a brave 
glow the torch of Pasquaney spirit. 
This was never allowed to burn low 
thereafter. The Old Boys, with re- 
markable promptness and enthu- 
siasm, caught on to it and upheld it; 
and, following their example, the 
new boys were soon adopting the 
Pasquaney way and striving to be 
worthy of its best traditions. This 
quickening spirit gained increase 
as the season advanced, and at the 
end of the summer we were living 
in a community that was as nearly 
ideal as the waywardness of human 
nature will permit — a community of 
wholesome youthfulness. 

There is credit enough for all 
those boys who strove with honor 
to make the season of 1922 the 
success that it has been. All 
seemed, to a greater or less de- 
gree, to cherish the splendid tra- 
dition of Pasquaney, started on 
its way many years ago by Mr. 
Ned and still zealously and ever 
more effectively guarded and guided 
by him. But especial praise is due 
the Captains of Industry, those 
veritable "first sergeants" of Pas- 
quaney, whose loyalty and effi- 
ciency are becoming each year more 
important factors in the success of 
our Camj). Young and inexperi- 
enced as most of them were, they 



were inclined at first to step falter- 
ingly and slowly ; but once they had 
sensed the demands and possibili- 
ties of their position, they accepted 
their challenge with a will that was 
unconquerable. Their loyalty was 
never in doubt : their youthful 
spirit, once guided and quickened, 
carried them — and, with them, the 
rest of the Camp — to the pinnacle 
of glorious attainment. 

Yes, undoubtedly the summer of 
1922 has been, to speak reservedly, 
one of Pasquaney's best seasons. 
Those few intimate observers, who 
are competent to judge, maintain 
that it has been her best season. As 
such it is also a pledge for those 
seasons still to come (may they be 
many!), as well as an added chal- 
lenge to all of us during those 
months of the year which we spend 
away from Pasquaney. It is hoped 
that the calendars which are being 
distributed with the "Annual" this 
year will be not only a token of re- 
membrance of a glorious summer, 
but, even more, a reminder to keep 
burning bright in the heart of each 
of us the flaming spirit of Pas- 
quaney. May that spirit never be 
quenched ! 



^c :}; ^ j(C >fc 



THE SPIRIT OF PASQUANEY 



What is Pasquaney spirit? Have 
you ever asked yourself that ap- 
parently easy question? We talk 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



17 




Photograph by Dr. L. T. Davidson 

SUNDAY MORNING SERVICE. 



about it, feel it, and live in it, al- 
ways conscious of this wonderful 
force that gives our Camp triumph 
after triumph as the years roll on. 

The answer is really very simple. 
Pasquaney spirit may be traced to 
its source and named in two words 
—Mr. Ned. 

In the beginning it was he who 
conceived the idea of a character- 
building institution ; who then went 
to work, forgetting self, built and 
evolved, pouring out upon those 
first lucky few the full power and 
love of that intangible spirit that 
makes Pasquaney what it was then 
and has been ever since. He taught 
energy, perseverance, unselfishness, 
purity, attainment, and service not 
only by his splendid talks but, more 
than that, by his own personal ex- 
ample. And those boys, themselves 
pervaded by his spirit, passed it on 
to their successors, and they in turn 
to us. Since that time Mr. Ned 



has never permitted a slump, always 
feeding and adding fuel to the 
spirit which his first pupils have 



This is the Love force which we 
like to term Pasquaney Spirit, that 
force which makes the Camp run so 
smoothly, and enables it to attain 
otherwise impossibly high ideals. 
Mr. Ned is the true Spirit of Pas- 
quaney ! 



Charles D. Gowing. 






THE CAMP PASQUANEY 
TRUST ASSOCIATION 



When Camp broke up last Au- 
gust, its further existence was 
threatened by the menace involved 
in the passing of the adjacent Soren 
Estate into strange hands to be used 
for strictly commercial purposes. 
A month-and-a-half later this men- 
ace was definitely removed by the 



i8 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



signing of papers transferring the 
Soren property to the newly or- 
ganized "Camp Pasquaney Trust 
Association" to be held and admin- 
istered for the continued good of 
the Camp. 

Thus is a long story made short. 
The Alumni Campaign, organized 
by Marshall M. Bartholomew, "09, 
and conducted by him, with the as- 
sistance of regional committees in 
Boston, New York, and Philadel- 
phia, has to date netted a sufficient 
amount of money to warrant the 




Photograph by Dr. L. T. Davidson 

AFTE.R THL SERVICE. 



purchase, for $40,000, of the entire 
Soren Estate for the Camp, and has 
furnished the additional hope that 
the money still needed to meet loans 
advanced to conclude the purchase 
will be forthcoming later. The 
Soren property will be administered 
by the Camp Pasquaney Trust As- 
sociation, which will be governed 
by a board of Trustees selected 
from the Alumni of Camp Pasqua- 
ney. By the terms of the agree- 
ment, Mr. Ned at his death will 
deed the present camp property and 
equipment to this new Association, 
which is a strictly legal institution 
under the laws of the State of New 
Hampshire; and thus the future of 
Pasquaney, entrusted to a group of 
old Pasquaney boys, is guaranteed 
beyond peradventure. 

The trial of this fall has in many 
ways been a blessing. The vaunted 
"Pasquaney spirit" was tried and 
not found wanting. The Alumni 
Campaign has rekindled the old 
spirit among many former Campers. 
Pasquaney has renewed old ties and 
formed new ones. Its life is to be 
perpetuated as long as the shores 
and hillsides of our beautiful Lake 
retain the natural charm which they 
now possess. And withal, the 
Camp faces a new era, — an era of 
wider usefulness and service. The 
old tradition is secure, and now new 
demands are to be made upon it. 
May we venture to hope that one of 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



19 



these demands will be for the defi- 
nite organization of a Pasquaney 
Alumni Association? 



The Camp was favored this year 
more than ever before by the large 
number of "Old Boys" who paid 
visits. Several of these remained 
with us for considerable lengths of 
time and not only bore witness to 
their staunch loyalty by the enthu- 
siastic manner in which they en- 
tered into the life of the Camp but 
also made their influence felt among 
both boys and counsellors. The 
visiting list includes the following: 
"Miff" Frothingham, '98; Harold 
Payson, '02; "Billy" Guild and 
"Rod" Beebe, '05; "Pa" Lillard and 
"Charlie" Farnsworth, '07; "Nellie" 
Curtis and "Pick" Low, '09; 
"Johnny" Hazen, '10; "Fritz" 
Gamage, '12; "Dell" Ladd, '14; 
George Blabon, '16; Henry de- 
Plum, "Bunny" Leonard, "Jerry" 
Sherman, and "Eddie" Wardwell, 
'17 ; "Tick" Hewitt, counsellor in 
1917; "Fuzzy" Kneeland, '18; "Ed- 
die" Dearden and "Dick" Donham, 
'19; "Phil" Donham, "Spud" Mur- 
phy, and "Lanty" Sims, '20; Dr. 
"Leddy" Leadbetter, counsellor 
1914-20; "Dusky" Brownell, "Dave" 
Grant, "Bob" Leonard, Owen Lind- 
say, "Tready" White, and "Dick" 
Zanetti, '21. 




p0fW"M 



iilii ;■ 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

LRNH5T D. LLVLRING, Jr. 



CRUMBS FROM THE COM- 
MISSARY" 



A few concise notes about my ex- 
periences in the Commissary, re- 
quested by the Editor, may be of 
service to my successors. 

Do not be surprised, when you 
are finishing your beauty sleep 
about an hour before reveille, if a 
hand is laid softly on your shoulder, 
and a voice whispers in your ear, 
"We want a package of pepper; I 
forgot to ask for it last night." 



20 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



With a sweet smile you must ri..e 
from your warm bed into the chill 

morning air, and hunt for the com- 
missary keys, and then spend the 
rest of the time till reveille in won- 
dering whether you can manage to 
go to sleep again before the bugle 
blows. On cold mornings, how- 
ever, you forgive such things, be- 
cause you have the privilege of 
hanging around the kitchen range, 
and getting warm, while the other 
poor guys of counsellors get only 
black looks from the chefs when 
they sneak in behind the serving 
counter. 

After breakfast a mob of galley 
boys will begin to circulate hil- 
ariously outside the commissary, 
and the chefs send deputations for 
supplies. Some of the former com- 
missary counsellors, I understand, 
drew a deadline at the door, and 
any boy crossing it was ejected 
promptly. This was a heartless 
proceeding. Next to eating, a boy 
enjoys nothing more than to look at 
food ; so why should not the kids 
have the pleasure of looking at the 
stuff they will soon deposit in their 
tummies? Only, you must be sure 
to guard the raisins and the prunes, 
or they will swipe all they can. 
Keep the boxes of prunes nailed up, 
or if you have an opened one, turn 
it upside down or pile other boxes 
on top of it. Then, if swiping is 
attempted, the noise will at once at- 
tract your attention, and you can 




p hoto$raph by E.. 5. Wilson 
THL WRECK OF THE. LAUNCH HOUSE. 
(What the Ice Can Do!) 

act promptly and decisively. After 
breakfast, also, the galley counsellor 
usually strolls in and carelessly asks 
if he can "borrow- a box of matches 
to burn up the trash." We under- 
stand each other perfectly. I hand 
out the box without comment, 
knowing that I shall see it no more, 
and though sometimes I wonder 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



21 



vaguely how a whole box of matches 
can be used in lighting one fire, I 
conclude that the trash must be 
damp or the breeze at the trash 
pile stronger than elsewhere. Later 
in the day some other counsellor 
may stroll in, after a preliminary 
clearing of the throat, casually ask 
if I can lend him a box of matches, 
hoping evidently that I won't ask 
absurd questions. I never do. I 
can tell by his manner that he wants 
the matches for official use, so I 
hand them out, and the counsellor 
promptly moves out of the zone of 
danger. 

When the weather is hot, fruit 
such as peaches, cantaloupes, etc., 
is apt to deteriorate quickly, and 
you should watch it carefully. I 
found that the best plan in hot 
weather was to sample it every day, 
by which means I could get a sure 
indication of its condition. In cold 
weather you need not sample it of- 
tener than once a day. It is best to 



select the worst specimens, and 
then you may be sure that the re- 
mainder is better. This rule, how- 
ever, I did not follow invariably. 

Space prevents describing other 
duties, such as the jamborees twice 
a week to Bristol ; the furnishing 
and despatching the huge supplies 
for the camping parties, and the 
subsequent enquiries, which must 
be tactfully conducted, for missing 
forks and spoons ; the guarding of 
materials for club teas and suppers 
(always followed by a raid on the 
commissary by half-starved coun- 
sellors after the function was over) ; 
and similar happenings. These are 
soulful experiences, and the Com- 
misariat, having in mind the saying 
of Napoleon, "An army marches on 
its stomach," must always remem- 
ber that the Camp will end in mu- 
tiny and failure unless he keeps it 
provided with a well-filled stomach. 
David A. Watt. 



TIPS FROM THE CHAIR 



(Being answers to inquiries on per- 
sonal and ethical topics addressed to the 
Editor. The Annual Board cannot be re- 
sponsible for the nature of these an- 
swers; the Editor himself is entirely ir- 
responsible.) 

Mr. S. St-w-t, Jr. : Yes, there is 
a subtle distinction between the 
Latin noun and the Latin verb. 
For particulars correspond with 



Prof. Charles Town Send, Prince- 
ton, N. J. 

Capt. Chas. C. Bu— 1: Yes, the 
Harvard- Yale game this year will 
be played at New Haven, Conn. 

R. A. Ki-b~l : For ingenuity of 
plot and vividness of imagination I 
would recommend Mr. E. Anthony 



22 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



Kelly's "The Return of the Cramp- 

ers" as the sort of play you are 
after. 

Mr. W. F. S-nf-d: I think the 
triple underhand trudgeon is prefer- 
able, with an occasional use of the 
dog-paddle crawl. Address your 
query to Judge Whitney Hoyt, 
Rochester, N. Y., for further advice. 

J. M. Cr-sm-n, Esq.: (1) A 
very effective remedy for blistered 
feet is to refrain from walking on 
them. (2) I have found that a 
very fair mustache may be acquired 
in a short time by letting the hair 
grow on the upper lip. 

Mr. F. O. R-d: The list which 
you enclosed names all the B. S. 
Merit Badges of which I have 
knowledge. I will retain your self- 
addressed stamped envelope for pos- 
sible future use. 

L. T. D-v-ds-n, M.D. : I appre- 
ciate the delicacy of the situation for 
one in your profession. Might not 
the middle name be changed to 
"Tom" or "Bomb" or, perhaps, 
"Tobias"? 

Mr. J. W. H-nn-g, Kentucky: 
In moments of glee the gouts Musk- 



rat is said to "chirp." The sound is 
hard to reproduce on paper. The 
only living authority on the subject 
is, I believe, Mr. W. Farnum Sand- 
ford, late of New Haven, Conn. 

Messrs. J. N. C, E. C. L., and E. 
H. R., Overbrook, Pa.: (1) There 
is some doubt about the origin of 
the word "Zits" : some seem to think 
that it has a relation to the sound 
of the barber's scissors (like "snip, 
snip") ; other authorities maintain 
that it represents the sound of the 
wind blowing through a dense 
growth of underbrush. (2) The in- 
ternational code of rules calls for a 
growth extending at least 7-8 of an 
inch from the lower chin. 

E. S. W-ls-n, Esq. : I can sym- 
pathize with you in vour predica- 
ment. From such a wildly assorted 
group it was hard to expect other- 
wise. The extreme youth of the 
commissariat, of course, fully ac- 
counts for his frivolity. Have you 
ever consulted Mr. Robert Will- 
iam's "Wild Counsellors I Have 
Met?" As the poet-philosopher, 
Eldehard W'ilhelm Cicily Jackstone, 
has it: "Let's keep the lid on." 



Best Camper 
Best Athlete 
Best Built 

Sandiest 



CAMP STATISTICS FOR 1922 
(as voted by the boys) 



Eliot Codman 

William F. Sanford 

W. Ward Tracy 

Ernest D. Leveriner 



Most Generous 

Edward 



r, 



erwiiu 



I. 2i 



Most Improved John Howland, Jr. 
Prettiest Clayton F. Banks 

Camp Cow Lloyd Bankson, 2nd 
Favorite Duty Boats 

Worst Duty Table 

Favorite College Yale 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



23 



CAMPING -PARTIES 




Sketch by J. C. Thompson 



CAMP CALAMITY 



After the second biggest flood 
since Noah's day had subsided, the 
worst calamity ever known to Belle 
Island descended in the form of a 
gang of campers. This crowd, 
under the leadership of the inimit- 
able Mr. Ned and Mr. Kennedy 
(otherwise known as Paddle-Foot 
Don), was composed of the ensu- 
ing: "Cocoa" Codman, "Quizzer" 
Banks, "Silent Ed" Berwind, "Tan- 
talizing" Brewster, "Marshmallow" 
Randell Lee, "Honey" Miller, "Ca- 
lamity" Morton, and "Monk" Pope. 
Our labors, putting up the tents and 
laying down the beds, were re- 
warded by our first "soak," followed 
by lunch. The afternoon passed 
uneventfully except for a dip. As 
soon as supper had been disposed 
of, we lay around the campfire and 
soon fell asleep as we tried to listen 
to the dulcet tones of Paddle-Foot 
Don recounting his adventures with 
the Reekee of South Africa. 



On Tuesday we arose more or 
less awake and had our daily morn- 
ing dip. Scarcely had we finished 
breakfasting when the "Rec" ap- 
peared with the mail, Mr. Watt, and 
the "Doc" on board. (We wonder 
why the latter always seems to 
manage to arrive in time for a 
meal!). The visitors were forced 
to remain in the tent for about fif- 
teen minutes, which, of course, 
seemed but two or three to them, 
while the rain demonstrated its 
ability to overflow our surrounding 
ditches. After a rainy lunch, Pad- 
dle-Foot led a wet game of "follow 
the leader." In this, only one per- 
son fell entirely into the water, 
which was quite a record consider- 
ing Don's extreme ( ?) recklessness. 
Since the rain continued in the 
afternoon, Mr. Ned and "Quizzer", 
much to their and our regret, were 
forced to leave for Camp in the 
"Rec." The night was passed in a 
rather dry condition, although some 
of us lay in puddles so deep that 



24 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



we were kept awake coming up for 
air. 

Wednesday was a clear day at 
last! The "Rec" brought us back 
Mr. Xed and the "Quizzer," whom 




Photograph by E. S. Wilson 

PART OF THE. PARTY 

we were all very glad to see. Jack 
Thompson and Ward Tracy came 
with them to put up a patented bed. 
For lunch we had a watermelon, 
and we noticed that our two visit- 
ors lingered. ("Never again," say 
we.) In the afternoon we crossed 
to Crescent for a few duckings. Mr. 
Ned cooked for us that evening a 
grand chicken dinner which quite 
equalled the cookery of the follow- 
ing night. 

W r e had a game of water baseball 
with the Hornets crowd on Thurs- 
day morning. Mr. Ned pitched the 
first inning so successfully that the 
enemy were unable to score a run. 
In the afternoon we held a track 
meet with the Cliffites; needless to 
say, it was a walk-away for us. 
Then followed our "feed." What 
a marvellous steak Mr. Ned cooked 



for us! The Doctor arrived just 
too late for our meal. Evidently he 
hadn't planned his evening skillfully 
enough to work in both ours and 
Cliff's repast. (Still worrying 
about food, Doc?) After dinner 
we all gathered around Don's re- 
markable campfire (?), and the re- 
sults of our statistics were as fol- 
lows : 
Best Camper 

Berwind and Miller (tied) 



Most Helpful 


Pope 


Most Cheerful 


Morton 


Pretty Boy 


Banks 


Water Rat 


Eliot Codman 


Camp Wit 


Morton 


Camp Quizzer 


Banks 


Best Cook 


Mr. Ned 


Although the 


campfire had just 


begun to burn, we turned in for the 


night. 






Photograph by E. 5. Wilson 

DON'S WATERMELON TREAT! 



The next, and last, morning we 
were up early, and after breakfast 
we completed our house-cleaning. 
Not until then did we notice that 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



25 



Cliff was just astir. All too soon 
the "Rec" came around to put an 
end to our happy, if boisterous, out- 
ing. 

G. W. Brewster, 

H. Miller. 



CAMP ALLAY-U-UP 



Dear Willie: 

I was certainly glad to hear from 
you so soon again. Yes, I have 
been camping at Newfound Lake all 
summer. You know, I had a most 
curious happening last week. I 
was camping all by myself on Cliff 
Island nearby when a band of fel- 
lows arrived from Camp Pasquaney 
across the lake. Well, I kept out 
of sight and determined to watch 
them until they should leave, for I 
am thinking of starting a camp of 
my own some day. (But this is be- 
tween us.) 

By listening very hard I finally 
got their names. There was "Mar- 
ney" Crosman, "Bill' Scull, and 
"Jim" Bovaird for men ; "Charlie" 
Clarke and "Tommy" Hawes for 
in-betweens ; and as ordinary fel- 
lows, John Rakestraw, "Spike" (or 
"Steve") Davol, "Gus" Bankson. 
"Joe" Vetterlein, "Joe" Fowler, 
"Kang" Lloyd, and "Bob" Gowing. 
Well, they surely were energetic 
people. They put up their tents, 
arranged shelves near the beach, 
and set up a stove in short order. 
Then they lost no time in going in 



for a swim ("soak" they called it). 
After a hasty luncheon had been de- 
voured, their doings were interrup- 
ted for a while by a storm. When 
things had cleared they amused 
themselves in various ways until it 
was time for the next meal. They 
had pancakes, which smelt so good 
to me that I paddled my canoe 
down to Idlewild to get a meal my- 
self. When I got back the campers 
were all asleep, most of them in the 
tents, although a few tried the cliff 
itself. 

The next morning the Bill Scull 
fellow had lots of fun catching min- 
nows in a canoe and caging them in 
an aquarium. Then, in a little 
while, a beautiful motor-boat ap- 
peared. They called her the 
"Wreck," but she looked like a 
mighty fine boat to me. After the 
"Wreck" had left, they had another 
"soak" which was interrupted by 
another rain. This kept up until 
after lunch, and Joe Fowler had to 
get out and beat it for the main 
camp in a boat. But after that the 
rain again cleared out. Well, some 
of the fellows went over to a place 
called Crescent Beach, and two 
others went down the lake in a 
canoe. These two came back very 
late with some live chickens which 
afterwards got loose on the island. 
Then began what they called "The 
Great Chicken Chase." One of the 
chicks scrambled right up the cliff! 
That night was rainy again, and 



26 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




Photograph by J. R. Vetterlein, Jr. 

THL LARLY MORNING DIP AT CAMP 
ALLAY-U-UP 



everybody slept under tents or 
canoes. 

Well, nothing much happened on 
Wednesday until the afternoon, 
when the campers built their Raft. 
This was a fine big log with little 
balancers out at the sides. When 
they had finished cruising in this, 
they proceeded to murder the chick- 
ens. Say, it was a bloody perform- 



That night the party had many waf- 
fles for supper and went to bed 
early — full-fed. 

The following afternoon the 
campers from Mr. Belle's little is- 
land met the Cliff fellows for a track 
meet on Crescent Beach. But my 
friends lost, being handicapped by 
the absence of Marney, who had 
paddled down the lake. Late in the 
afternoon the "Wreck" came again 
with that red-sweatered Doctor fel- 
low, and then they all had a big 
"feed." Gee, wdiat a feast! Waf- 
fles ! chicken ! pancakes ! doughnuts ! 
ice cream ! Afterwards they sat 
around and voted what they called 
"statistics" ("statis-digs" would be 
a more appropriate name for some 
of the things), which turned out as 
follows : 

Best Camper "Johnny" Rakestraw 
Most Helpful "Bob" Gowing 

Water Bug "Kang" Lloyd 

Pretty Boy "Spike" Davol 

"Cow" (whatever that means) 

"Joe" Fowler 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

WAITING FOR A COURT 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



27 



When they got up the next morn- 
ing (Friday), the boat came before 
they were ready, and so it had to re- 
turn for them regardless of expense. 
Well, as I saw those fine fellows dis- 
appearing in the distance, I felt 
very sorry. 

Well, Willie, I hope you are hav- 
ing a fine summer. Remember me 
to all the boys. 

Yours ait revoir, 

Jack. 

Note : Letter discovered and 
copied by R. B. Gowing. 



THIS HAPPENED AT HOR- 
NETS 



I. 

("The following is the substance 
of a letter from "Nick" Cardo, of 
the Groton School Camp, to his 
mother.) 
Dere Ma — 

I'm aflingin youse dis line cause 
i tinks you otter know wot fools too 
much moneys makes of people. I 
wisht ^you could see de soft bunch 
that kemped acrost de fish pond 
from us at wot dey calls Hornets 
Cove. Two of de boobs wot coun- 
sels us went to lamp em, and you 
otter here de junk dey juggled back 
an forth. A couple of Dicks wot 
dey calls Sage-er-beer and Kimball 
(pop probly makes Kimball's Brass 
Polish) were generals to a army of 
de softest sissies wot I ever would 
a laid my eyes on if Id seed em. 



De biggest man in de chorus wuz a 
guy wot answer to de whistle of Ed 
Lihme. "Chink ' Smif, Chollie 
Gowing, Ed Ritchie, Chaws Good- 
rich (youse could smell his suspen- 
ders burnin), Telford Tailor, Wallie 
Wyeth an Chollie Stanwood were 
de rest of de high kickers. 

De soup course was to set up de 
tents so as de sweet little tings 
could dress under cover. Den after 
guzzling grub, dey has their men 
read a parshment entitled to "De 
Moon Pool." Dey didnt do much 
de last few numbers dat day until 
dey wakes up de nex A M when de 
president of de gas works — Mister 
Ned dey sez him — comes to take 
em all home cause its melted — 
snowing, but dont, cause dey all de- 
clines eccept dis fella Lihme. De 
son of de brass polish king cooked 
hardtack, flapjacks an beans fur 
brekfust, lunch or somthing. I 
cant remember all de fool stuff our 
counselor feller let loose. Anyway 
dey didnt do much dat day until dey 
had a reglar genuwine slap-your- 
wrist water baseball game nex 
morning wit de odder gang of sof- 
ties down a block an a half round 
de corner of de isle. Now aint dat 
poetic ? Even den de bunch of he- 
flappers from de cove got stung — 
9 to 1 — even if dey wasnt at Hor- 
nets. 

Hoping your de same 

Your beloving son, 

Nick. 



28 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



II. 
(The following is the substance 

of a letter from Master Archibald 
Spott of Camp No-Glee to his 

mother.) 

July 21, 1922. 
My dearest Mother: 

I am forced to consider No-Glee a 
perfeet camp in every respect but 
one. This camp has the most ex- 
traordinary neighbors ! A number 
of boy animals, now bivouacing at 
the charming wooded spot, Hornets 
Cove, amaze and shock me. One 
is momentarily discouraged at the 
hope of human advancement and is 
compelled to believe the race is re- 
turning to the nomadic existence. 
These boys have naught but a frail 
canvas between them and the stars 
themselves. They abandon them- 
selves completely to water baseball, 
an aquatic form of the national 
horror. One instance of this aban- 
donment was a water baseball game 
with their neighbors, the Smacka- 
ways (note this vulgarity). And 
in the afternoon after the contest, 
they, not contented with an out- 
pouring of animal vitality, walked 
on foot up the slope of Sugarloaf!!! 
Can one believe the reports that one 
hears brought to one's ears? 

On the next day, after another 
contest of baseball with their neigh- 
bors of Belle Isle, they enacted a 
perambulation of 18 miles to Wel- 
ton's Falls. This is what particu- 
larly amazes me — that the vulgar 
mid- Victorian practice of using the 




Photograph by T. H. Hinchman, Jr. 

PREPARING BRLAKFA5T 

pedal extremities for traveling un- 
heard-of distances is still found in 
our modern mind-over-matter exist- 
ence ! What disgusts me is now to 
follow. On their return the camp- 
ers ate the most tremendous "feed," 
to use the vernacular. Apparently 
this indelicate proceeding did not 
die out with the embers of the 
pagan Roman Empire. I am glad 
that they at least abstained from 
gormandizing. After the orgy, 
"statistics" were engaged in? I 
will enclose them to demonstrate to 
you to what depths the human or- 
ganism can fall. 

Camp Name None at all 

Best Camper Edwin Ritchie 

Most Helpful Charles Goodrich 

"Sandiest" boy Charles Stanwood 
Most Argumentative 

Telford Taylor 
"Bathing Girl" ( !) Telford Taylor 
Best "Emanuel Camper" 

Richard Sagebeer 
"Lord High Dripper" (oh!) 

Charles Gowing 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



29 



Please excuse this letter for its 
brevity and its meagreness of vocab- 
ulary. 

From your loving and obedient 
son, 

Archibald. 
Letters edited and made present- 
able by 

Charles D. Gowing, 
Edwin L. Ritchie. 



CAMP SMACKAWAY 



"Why, if it isn't Dick Berresford ! 
Just get back?" 

"Sure. And we had a peach of a 
time." 

"I'll bet you did. Let me see, 
where were you ?" 

"At Mayhews." 

"Oh, yes — 'Udo' Bradley's and 
'Bunce' Comstock's party. Did you 
have a good bunch along?" 

"You bet. We had 'Don' Mur- 
chie as our C. O. I., 'Jim' Henning, 
'Louie' Jefferson, 'Bob' Eisenbrey, 
'Johnny' Howland, and — let me see 
— oh, yes, 'Boots' Marshall and 
'Ned' Wurst and, of course, myself." 

"Pretty good gang. What did 
you do with yourselves all the 
time?" 

"Oh, everything. When we got 
to Mayhew's, we found a shack 
there. So instead of putting up 
the commissary tent we stored the 
grub in the shanty. Don and Bob 
had pup tents ; Commy, Jim, and 
Udo made a large pine-bough affair 



to sleep in ; I rigged up a cord ham- 
mock ; and the rest satisfied them- 
selves with the tent. In the after- 
noon Don, Boots and John went 
black-berrying, or, as Udo put it, 
'burying niggers.' Incidentally 

they returned with every type of 
berry except a black one. That 
night Udo's puns and Howland's 
limericks spoiled the campfire. I 
guess that's all for Monday." 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

WASHING DI5HE.5 



"What about Tuesday?" 
"To begin with, Udo and Commy 
actually got up for breakfast. Upon 
rising Udo said that he had slept 
like a log except for the mosquitoes ; 
Jim and Commy said that they also 
had slept like logs except for Udo. 
Later in the morning we made a 
water-baseball diamond, and Jim 
Henning's 'Smackers' won the first 
battle of a three-game series over 
my 'Drippers.' Bob Eisenbrey, 
catching for the 'Drippers,' starred 
for the 'Smackers.' The afternoon 
was foggy, but Udo nevertheless 
wanted to climb Sugarloaf, a 



3° 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



strange desire for one of his tem- 
perament. We, on the other hand, 
did not want to do anything so en- 
ergetic ; so we compromised by go- 
ing to a house which Jack Thomp- 
son had said was haunted. Find- 
ing a newspaper of the preceding 
Sunday in the ice chest, we realized 
that we had to cope with a very 
modern ghost ; so we scrambled out. 
On our return to camp we found 
'Dick' Kimball and Walter Wyeth, 
who brought a water-baseball chal- 
lenge from Hornets. Needless to 
say, we accepted. Oh, by the way, 
all this time Udo's puns had been 
getting worse and worse. 

"The Hornets team came over the 
next morning. We each took char- 
coal from the fire and labelled our- 
selves with the team letter, 'S' for 
'Smacker.' Of course we won, 
though only by the close score of 
9-1. Then, that afternoon, came the 
prize stunt of the party, when Don, 
Jim, and Bob w^ent fishing up Fow- 
lers River in a canoe. Jim trolled 
with a piece of pork which never 
went more than six feet back of the 
canoe, the hook catching frequently 
in Don's paddle. Bob had better 
luck, since he was trolling with a 
full reel of line and a spoon. Dur- 
ing the first few minutes he felt a 
sharp bite but didn't pull his line 
in. He felt these bites again and 
again. When the outlet of Fow r - 
ler's was reached, Bob finally reeled 
in his line, because the lily pads 
were getting thick, and to his great 



surprise found that he had been 
towing a chub all the way from 
Mayhew's ! 

"The following morning we im- 
proved our diamond and lay in wait 
for the Kimball and Sagebeer Fly- 
ing Circus. They never appeared, 
however ; so we were forced to play 
another game among ourselves. 
The 'Drippers' evened up the series 
by winning. During the morning 
the 'Rec' had brought ice cream for 
our big feed. The sight of the food 
was too much for Udo, who put the 
clock ahead ; and we had ice cream 
for dinner. Eisenbrey, Marshall, 
and Howland furnished great 
amusement in the afternoon by 
their violent attempts at life-saving 
which Don was trying to teach 
them. Later on the 'Drippers' 
won the final game of the series 
after a blood-thirsty struggle." 

"Well, how r about the feed?" 

"Oh, we had a great one. In the 
middle of the meal the Grotonians 
came around in some of their 'arks' 
and gave us a rousing, though un- 
intelligible, cheer. We returned 
the compliment and a snappy repar- 
tee followed." 

"I hear you were the first party 
ready this morning?" 

"You bet we were. We were 
not only the first party ready but 
the only party on deck when Cap'n 
Smith showed up." 

"Who was best camper?" 

"Jim Henning was Best Camper, 
Dick Berresford— Most Helpful, 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



3i 



Johnny Howland — Water Rat, 
Jim Henning — Camp Cow, 
Bunce Comstock — Most Cheerful, 
and Udo got an absolutely unani- 
mous vote for the Most Horrible 
Punner." 

"Dick" Berresford, 
"Don" Murchie. 



CAMP DOWANNALEVE 



"Hello, Ward, did you have a 
good time at Sanborn's?" 

"No, Randy, but we did at May- 
hew's ; Jack Thompson's and Bob 
Diefendorf's party, you know." 

"Who else was with you '' 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

THL PARTY 

"Well, Frank Reed, Bob Gray, 
Jack Hinchman, Basil Henning, 
Guy Murchie, Paul Bird, and Sonny 
Hollister. We were having a short 
soak when Captain Smith came for 
us in the Stella. When we got to 
Mayhew's we put up a tent, and 
then chopped some wood, and then 



put up another tent, and then 
chopped some more wood." 

"Is that all ? Huh ! And then you 
went to bed, I suppose !" 

"No we didn't, either! We had 
a campfire at night and read some 
blood-and-thunder stories, like 
'Skeleton Island." 

"What did you do on Tuesday?" 

"Oh, we built a dock for 'Doc' to 
land at (ha! ha!), and — " 

"Whew! What a wet one!" 

— "and then we paddled around 
a while, and Paul Bird and Sonny 
Hollister tried to chase frogs ; but, 
of course, they didn't catch any. 
On Wednesday — the next day, 
you know — the 'Doc' brought 'Cap- 
tain Teddy' Jackson and Sandy to 
stay with us the rest of the week. 
Tommy Hawes and Don Murchie 
came out and set the pace for the 
'Rec' in a canoe. They had a soak 
with us at Mayhew's. But we 
didn't like so much company ; so we 
went off and picked berries up on 
the hill." 

"Don said something about beds, 
I remember. What did you do — 
smuggle cots over with you?" 

"Naw ! We made them out of 
boughs and cord. Some of them 
were awfully comfortable, too ! 
There were two on Wednesday, 
and two on Thursday. And, say, 
on Thursday Mr. Jackson and some 
of the crowd went over to Bridge- 
water in a canoe for food ; and a 
squall came up and they only got 



32 



THE PASOUANEV ANNUAL 



as far as a point half way over. 
There was a girls' camp there, and 
Basil Henning pulled their boat up 
on the shore so that it wouldn't 
hang to pieces on the rocks. (May- 
be we didn't kid him about it after- 
wards!) After the crowd had 
waited and waved at us for a long 
time, we went after them in a row- 
boat." 

"Did you have a good feed, 
Ward?" 

"You bet we did! Chicken and 
real food like that. And then we 
had statistics, of course — " 

"Oh, what did you get?" 

"Best Camper; and Bobby Gray 
got 'Runner-up,' — " 

"What's that?" 

"That's the same as Most Help- 
ful at the cheap parties, but we 
didn't want any cheap stuff ; that's 
what that is. Guy Murchie got 
'Most Argumentative' because he 
and Sonny Hollister argued so 
much. He got Water Rat, too." 

"Didn't you have anything bad?" 



yi% 






.-r ^— 







only had Laziest, and Birdie got 
that. We named the cam p 
'DOWANNALEVE.' " 

"That's a nice name. Well, you 
must have had a pretty good party. 
Let's go up and put some more 
boards on the shack, Ward." 

"All right, Randy, let's." 

Frank O. Reed. 



CAMP WURKUVART 



Photograph by P. Chubb, 2d 

LARLY(?) MORNING! 



No, that's cheap stuff too! We 



It was on July 10th, a whole week 
late, that the first flotilla of camping 
parties launched out across the lake. 
The day was most favorable. Des- 
tiny had allotted to our party the 
isle of Cliff, noted for its high div- 
ing and high sleeping, and it was an 
expectant, up-and-going group of 
campers that scrambled down the 
gang-plank of "Cap'n" Smith's craft 
as her bow grated on the pebbly 
beach. C. of I. "Dave" Hinchman 
was well among the first, sur- 
rounded fore and aft, as well as to 
port and starboard, by "Boiled 
Stones" Campbell, "C h u b b y" 
Chubb, "Johnny" Curtis, Ivy Lee, 
"Coggin" Lindsay, "Eddie" Rake- 
straw, and "Bolt" Winpenny. 
Messrs. Harry Hinchman and 
Spaeth, nominally in charge of this 
select group, were the last to aban- 
don the ship as she turned her prow 
eastward. 

The attraction of the first camp- 
ing-party swim made the usual pre- 
liminary work a quick procedure. 
The first contact with Cliff Island 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



33 



water was a bracing experience, so 
much so, in fact, that "Chubby'' 
was tempted to match the thickness 
of his skin against the hardness of 
the rocky cliff. "Chubby" had to 
admit defeat, though his spirit re- 
mained undaunted. After a light 
lunch our party established a camp- 
ing party precedent by observing 
rest period ; but the reaction was un- 
favorable, and the experiment was 
never repeated. The rest of the day 
was ours to enjoy as we saw fit in- 
dividually. There was nothing un- 
toward that should be chronicled 
here. Almost everyone was asleep 
when Mr. Spaeth reached the end 
of the campfire story in the eve- 
ning — a detective story featuring 
one "Dr. Fortune." 

Most of us arose at quite a rea- 
sonable hour on Tuesday morning 
and had the camp in shape for in- 
spection when the "Rec" hove to, 
bringing Mr. Jackson, the Doctor, 
and the mail. The sight of Mr. 
Jackson almost scared some of our 
party into imagining that we were 
doomed to an early return because 
of the slightly wet ground ; but his 
cheery smile soon dispelled all our 
fears and the morning passed mer- 
rily. Soon after lunch the Hinch- 
man brothers went in quest of a few 
chickens, while the rest of us wen- 
ded our way to Crescent Beach for 
a game of water baseball with the 
crowd from Hornet's. But the 
game was postponed on account of 
cold water. The chickens were not, 



however. They were very much 
alive when Harry and Dave re- 
turned, and they keot these two in- 
trepid sportsmen quite busy for the 
remainer of the day. At campfire 
"Dr. Fortune" proved just as rest- 
ful as before. 

Camping party technique was be- 
ginning to make itself felt by 
Wednesday morning, and we all 
rose late. Mr. Ned favored us with 
a visit soon after breakfast and flat- 
teringly agreed with us that our 
cofTee was the best yet. In the 

afternoon Mr. Spaeth conducted 
some of the more venturesome of 
the party to Bridgewater (via May- 
hew's), while the three "Stay-at- 
Homes" — Harry, Dave, and Bolt — 
energetically devoted their time to 
the construction of a dock for the 
accommodation of visiting deep-sea 
craft. The chicken dinner and the 
campfire marshmallows and cocoa 
to supplement another good story 
closed in another active day. 

There was a feeling of expectancy 
in the air when we rolled out of our 
blankets the next morning. It 
took but a short time to pile up a 
cord or two of fire wood, and then 
half of our party journeyed to Cres- 
cent Beach, where we worked off 
considerable energy in a water base- 
ball game with picked members of 
the Hornets and Crescent campers. 
The result is immaterial. After a 
light lunch, Messrs. Chapin and 
Spaeth combined forces, braved the 
storm-tossed waters, and paddled 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



the length of the lake for steak and 

drinks. They were greeted with 
heart)- cheers on their safe return 
with the goods. Necessarily the 
banquet was a crowning success. 
Details would be superfluous. After 
everyone agreed that he had feasted 
enough, a light was touched to the 
huge campfire ; and as the pile 
flared up we voted statistics, to the 
following effect : 

Best Camper "Bolt" Winpenny 
Most Helpful "Eddie" Rakestraw 
Water Rat "Coggin" Lindsay 

Pretty Boy 

"Eddie" Rakestraw again 
Noisiest "Ivy" Lee 

The "Stella 3rd" found us but ill 
prepared to re-embark when she ar- 
rived next morning, so reluctant 
were we to depart. But all things 
must end, as we regretfully ac- 
knowledged when the last batch of 
us boarded the boat on her second 
trip and chugged across to Camp. 
And just so ends this history. 
I. L. Lee, Jr., 
J. W. Spaeth, Jr. 



CAMP SLAPPENSKRATCH 



In spite of inclement weather, 
which prevented the departure of 
all camping parties "on schedule 
time," Camp Slappenskratch at Hor- 
net's Cove was an unmistakable 
success. We were blessed, in the 
first place, with an excellent duet of 
cooks in the persons of Chauncey 
Buell and "Chas" Townsend. and 




Photograph by P. Owen, Jr. 

LOOKS LIKE. A CLOSE. 5HAVL ! 

the food provided through the gra- 
ciousness of Commissary Watt was 
fitting material for their skilled 
cookery. There was one circum- 
stance, at least, that kept us ever on 
the alert — the painstaking persist- 
ency of the hordes of mosquitoes 
that clustered about us day and 



night. 



Time and again we were 



aroused from promising dreams to 
slap wildly at the taunting, buzzing 
beasts who bullied us so persever- 
ingly, only to prepare to repeat the 
performance at the next attack. 

We had a splendid company. 
Scott Stewart, otherwise called 
"Harry", proved to be an unbeat- 
able stoker who fed the fire with 
Satanic regularity. The brilliant 
inventive genius of "Hank" Owen 
(his original name of, "Percy" was 
deemed inappropriate) enabled us 
to feed in luxury on a semi-table 
effect and to serve our courses with 
a minimum chance of "cowing." 
Thorn King, dubbed "My little 
Sugar Plum" because of his fond- 
ness for calling "Chas" Townsend 
by that name, was a distinct addi- 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



35 



t ion to the party ; most of his time 
he spent "cowing" himself from a 
canoe whenever opportunity offered. 
"Dick" Leonard was a mosquito in 
himself and took his pleasure from 
arguing with the Codman brothers, 
"Dan" and "Sam," with Charlie act- 
ing as referee. "Mack" Galbraith, 
with the flaming top, was a steady 
wielder of the axe and together with 
"Fred" Leonard accumulated a 
goodly pile of fuel for our greedy 
fires. "Bill" Sanford, the Cap'n o' 
Ind'stry, did his share of work and 
consumed his share of victuals. 

We started Camp Slappenskratch 
as all such institutions are started. 
The raising of the tents and the ar- 
rangement of the commissary rap- 
idly preceded the first soak, which 
was long but not tedious. Likewise 
our first meal was excellent, as such 
meals always are. The rest of the 
day we spent at Hornet's Cove 
growing; nothing fatal occurred. 

Tuesday was passed much in the 
same fashion. In the afternoon 
Chauncey, Fred and Bill crossed to 
"Archie's" to obtain provisions, 
while the remainder of our troupe, 
headed by Charlie, went up Fow- 
ler's River in a vain search for 
frogs. In fact, their toll was noth- 
ing better than more mosquito bites 
and hearty appetites. They were 
patiently waiting at camp when the 
"Archie" contingent returned. 

On the next day, our camp was 
visited by "Don" Murchie and 
"Tommy" Hawes who had trav- 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

QUOITS IS ALWAYS POPULAR 



ersed the lake in a canoe in search 
of free lunch. We provided that. 
Most of us took the trail to Crescent 
in the afternoon to enjoy the swim- 
ming. A scheduled track meet did 
not materialize because of the sub- 
merged beach. Charlie Townsend 
and Bill, bent on other game, pro- 
cured some chickens in a lively 
state and escorted them back to 
camp for further consideration. 



36 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



We were back at Crescent Beach 
on Thursday morning, and every- 
one enjoyed a pickup game of water 
baseball between teams captained 
by "Aleck" Phelps and "Bill' San- 
ford. Aleck's crowd proved to be 
superior hitters and won the con- 
test hands down. Chauncey was 
the only one who did not return in 
the afternoon ; he stuck close to 
camp to give the fowls his culinary 
care. That evening w r e enjoyed a 
chicken and waffle dinner that ter- 
minated in ice cream and pie. Ev- 
erybody went to his bed filled, 
sleepy, and happy. 

The next and last morning was 
given over merely to preparations 
for our sad departure. We were 
not in time for Captain Smith, of 
the "Stella III," however, and he 
and his craft were forced to take 
only a few of us along, while the 
rest of us waited with the baggage 
for the second trip. 

The statistics of our party dis- 
close that 

Percy Owen and Thorn King were 
Best Campers, 

Scott Stewart was Most Helpful, 
"Sam" Codman was Most Cheerful, 
Thorn King was Water Rat. 

W. F. Sanford. 



CAMP VAGABOND 



On the tenth day of the seventh 
month and at the tenth hour, the 
great chiefs, "Skita" Scull and Vin- 
ton, son of Chapin, ventured forth 



upon the waters of the lake with 
"Aleck" Phelps, the armor bearer, 
and warriors "Pete," son of Lillard ; 
Francis of Harding, the ape-man ; 
John the Porter; "Johnnie," son of 
Lindsay ; Thomas, of the clan of 
Eliot; "W T ids" De La Cour ; and 
"Cupid," of the tribe of Beckwith. 
After a stormy voyage across the 
water they did come to a place that 
is called Sanborn's Point. And 
there they did eat, and rest, and pre- 
pare a dwelling place. Thereafter 
the people of this tribe did enter 
into the waters and were swallowed 
up in the midst thereof. And when 
they had come forth, they did eat 
and refresh themselves with sleep, 
for they were overcome with much 
weariness. Thus was the begin- 
ning and the ending of the first day. 
At the next dawn the tribe arose, 
and when they all, even the least 
of them, had bathed and eaten. 
Chief "Teddy" came unto them 
from across the waters : and spake : 
"There are maidens," quoth he, 
"from a neighboring tribe who do 
earnestly covet your dwelling place 
to have it for themselves. Hence 
get thee hence." So the tribe did 
gather its possessions and did de- 
part in a vessel unto the beach 
which is called Crescent. Still 
again did they eat and bathe ; and 
forthwith five of the tribe, mighty 
warriors all, did go and search for 
victuals, while the rest did sport in 
the waters. As eventide drew near, 
they embarked in boats, and Vin- 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



37 



ton did read unto them the word of 
Owen Johnson. But when they 
had returned, there descended upon 
them a scourge as of many winged 
insects from the air, until "Skita" 
Scull and Cupid did flee out upon 
the waters and sleep thereon. Thus 
was the beginning and the ending of 
the second day. 

On the next day at dawn they 
bathed, as is the custom of this 
tribe. Then came certain persons 
from their own land with pies and 
other offerings. And thereupon the 
seekers after truth did eat and 
bathe and eat again. Later on that 
same day they did go upon the 
mount which is called Sugarloaf; 
for they did desire mightily to es- 
cape from the multitude of insects 
of the air. But the wrath of Je- 
hovah was upon them ; and the 
winged creatures did pursue them 
and did drive five of the mightiest 
of the tribe to the island of the 
Cliffs, where they did tarry that 
night without the knowledge of the 
Cliff-dwellers. Thus was the begin- 
ning and the ending of the third day. 

Upon the morrow the afflicted of 
the tribe did return to their tents. 
When they had ended their morn- 
ing repast, the Cliff-dwellers did ap- 
proach ; for they did mightily desire 
young kids and goats to offer up as 
a sacrifice to the great deity, Water 
Baseball. But the eagle of Jehovah 
appeared as a sign that they should 
not get the goats of the chosen peo- 
ple. And so the Cliff-dwellers did 
flee in their discomfiture. Thereat 



the sons of Scull and Chapin did re- 
joice and wax exceeding glad ; so 
that they did all of them fall upon 
the victuals that night and feast 
mightily and long. And that all 
might know the merit of this tribe, 
they did anoint and appoint the fol- 
lowing: 




WW* ■ s£v 








Photograph by W. 5. De La Cour 

"THE. VAGABONDS" 



Best Tribesman "Pete" 

Best Helper "Cupid" 

Least Melancholy "Ape-man" 

The Cow John of Lindsay 

Most Ladyish John the Porter 

Mermaidlike "Cupid" 

Then did the tribe find favor in the 
sight of Jehovah, and a mighty wind 
did drive away the winged scourge ; 
and all did sleep heavily, for they 
were weary. Thus was the beginning 
and the ending of the fourth day. 

At the next dawn the tribe did 
gather their tents and possessions 
and did depart in a boat to Pas- 
quaney, their own land ; and there 
they were well received. And their 
hearts were glad even as their limbs 
were weary. P. V. Beckwith. 



3» 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



WATER SPORTS OF 1922 




Photograph by A. W. Moody 

THE. EXHIBITION CREAv'5 



The Twenty-seventh Annual 
Water Sports Day, which was wit- 
nessed by so many of our enthusias- 
tic friends, serves very well as a 
concrete example of Pasquaney's 
greatest accomplishment — that of 
turning out American gentlemen — 
sportsmen. Even the smallest 

youngsters, led on by the splendid 
example of our "old boys," showed 
that they could play the game right 
up to the end and still accept either 
victory or defeat with equal grace. 



Incessant, early season rains so 
upset the routine of Camp activities 
that barely a week was available to 
prepare for the Sports. But effic- 
iency and co-operation on the part 
of the counsellors in charge of 
events, together with the ever-ready 
and eager help of the boys, easily 
counteracted this handicap. All 
events were brought up to the finals 
by Thursday, leaving Friday for 
complete relaxation. Water 

Sports Day, Saturday, the twenty- 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



39 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

WARD TRACY'S "JACK DIVE. 



ninth of July, showed promise of 
being ideal. It was ideal for the 
spectators, while the competitors 
were only slightly handicapped by 
a strong north-westerly wind. 

The Dana and Birch exhibition 
crews opened the program and 
showed by their grace and precision 
the effect of skilled coaching and 
faithful practice. The canoe races, 
while not very closely contested, 
were intensely interesting as spec- 
tacles and as exhibitions of skillful 
and unskillful paddling. Of the 
three, the War Canoe Race seemed 



to attract the most attention. "Bill" 
Sanford had some difficulty in lead- 
ing Donald Murchie in the Senior 
100- Yards swim, while Winpenny 
just nosed out Howland for third 
place. In spite of rough weather, 
the diving proved to be a very cred- 
itable performance. First place was 
awarded to Ward Tracy, who se- 
lected more difficult and more spec- 
tacular optional dives than did 
Owen and Ritchie who were second 
and third respectively. By clever 
headwork "Charlie" Clarke and 
Ward Tracy reached the finals in 
the Witherbee Black Obstacle Race. 
It was a hard, gruelling test that 
called for clever paddling and 
strong swimming. Clarke's cool- 
ness and endurance gave him a well 
earned victory. The Canoe Tilt 
turned out to be the hardest fought 
contest of the day. After many 
minutes of hard, clean tilting and 




Photograph by R. G. Sagebeer 
"A BOX DIVL* 



4 o 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

WARD TRACY AND RANDY L.E.E. WINNING THE. OBSTACLE. RACE 



paddling, Ward Tracy and Randell 
Lee finally overcame "Bill" Sanford 
and Francis Harding. In the Jun- 
ior 50- Yards swim "Joe" Vetterlein 
won quite handily from Berresford 
and "Jack" Clarke who finished in 
the order named. 

The Sub-Junior Events — dingey, 
obstacle, and swimming races — 
were, as usual, greatly appreciated 
by the audience. Edward Rake- 
straw, by winning the obstacle race 
and getting second place in the 25- 
Yards swim was awarded Sub-Jun- 
ior General Excellence. The Sen- 
ior General Excellence medal was 
won by Ward Tracy who entered 
six events and qualified to compete 
on Water Sports Day in five of 



them. Out of these five, he won 
two and had one second place to his 
credit, this giving him a total of 
eight points. 

After the sports we escorted our 
guests to Memorial Hall, where a 
delightful supper was served by the 
Camp. Retreat was closely fol- 
lowed by the Water Sports Plays. 
From the theatre our guests were 
taken to Baird Hall, where the sing- 
ing was held and the cups and 
medals for the afternoon's contest 
awarded, while the huge campfire 
burned slowly to ashes on campfire 
rock. So ended our Twenty-sev- 
enth Annual W r ater Sports Day. 
C. C. Buell. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



4i 



DRAMATICS IN 1922 





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Photograph by J. B. Campbell 

FINAL 5CMNL IN "AN AFFLICTE.D MAN* 



Whether or not the acting in the 
early clays of Camp was as good as 
at the present time, is a question 
which must be fought out by the 
"old grads." The fact remains 
that the plays and vaudeville of to- 
day are produced in a much superior 
way, due to our excellent modern 
equipment. The new overhead 
electric lighting, with dimming fa- 
cilities and a movable olivet flood 
light, for color effects, make possi- 
ble a great variety of convincing 
and artistic settings. 

The dramatic season opened with 
a vaudeville show on July 8th which 
brought out a number of spontan- 
eous acts of surprising quality. 
"Calamity" Morton made his debut 
in some colored monologues with 



the true mellow drawl of the south. 
Messrs. Thompson and Cornstock 
threw a dash of mystery into the 
evening with a hypnotic act of no 
mean character. (Some say it was 
awfully simple : others say it was 
simply awful !) The program was 
concluded by an airy and sylphlike 
ballet, featuring that paragon of 
beauty and awkwardness, "Lady 
Jane" Porter. 

On the following Saturday the 
first outfit of returning campers was 
greeted by "The Tragedy of Belle 
Island," a melo-dramatic atrocity 
depicting the loss by trickery of 
that ideal camping spot, the final 
exposure of the villain, and the res- 
toration of the property to Mr. Ned. 
The entrance of "Eddie" Lihme at 



42 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



the Ik ad of a piquante chorus of 
( )naway campers ought to have 
softened even the hard heart of Mr. 
Cornstalk, the real estate sharper. 
But the cruel man remained un- 
moved, and Onaway gave place to 
two unshaven counsellors from 
Wah-kee-nah. The act closed with 
"Charlie" Gowing and "Jimmy" 
Henning in a picturesque, even 
though effeminate, representation 
of Camp "Noglee," so christened af- 
ter Rudyard Kipling's nickname for 
the African milk-drinking crawfish. 
The final act was perpetrated in the 
East Hebron court, which was ably 
presided over by the impassive 
Judge Hoyt. "Gus" Bankson, the 
head juryman, leapt over the foot- 
lights and presented Mr. Ned with 
a deed to the cherished island ; and 
a fanfare of trumpets proclaimed 
the evening's performance at an 
end. 

The second Stay-at-Homes, under 
the direction of Mr. Thompson, 
opened up hitherto untouched mines 
of talent. Such surprises as Doc- 
tor Davidson slicing one of the 
smaller boys to bits, "Sonny" Hol- 
lister and "Charlie" Wood in a col- 
lection of rapid-fire, negro "wise- 
cracks," Basil Henning impersonat- 
ing the famous Rag Doll whose 
brains needed winding every other 
minute, and Ward Tracy in an ex- 
traordinary exhibition ol tumbling, 
held the audience spell-bound. Mr. 
Watt, the Camp's most versatile 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

OUR "MOST VERSATILE. COMUDIAN" 

comedian, chalked up another vic- 
tory in the form of a Scotch mono- 
logue. Rut the real side-splitter of 
the evening was "Jack" Thompson 
in the role of the World's Most Fa- 
mous Musician. Time after time 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



43 



the great auditorium rocked with 
mirth as he broke into the familiar 
refrain : "By the way — did you 
ever hear the one about" etc., etc. 
The show ended with a parody on 
"Old Man Noah," the rendition of 
which was only equalled by the 
awkwardness of the chorus. In 
our estimation it was the best all- 
around vaudeville bill of the season. 

The Water Sports dramatics this 
year consisted of two one-act plays, 
"A Morality Play for the Leisure 
Class," by Lloyd Balderston, and a 
farce comedy by Charles Bird enti- 
tled "An Afflicted Man." 

The Morality Play has to do with 
the soul of a modern business man 
which, departing from his earthly 
body in a motor accident, arrives in 
a place which he supposes to be 
heaven. Here he is attended by a 
Presence, and is allowed to have 
everything he desires and to do only 
what he wishes. He becomes so 
bored with this milk-and-honey ex- 
istence that in an outburst of feel- 
ing he wishes he were in Hell, and 
learns, to his great amazement, that 
he has been there all the time. 

The farce is the story of Nathan- 
iel Jenkins, an attractive young man 
who has no means of his own but 
hopes to inherit his Uncle Henry's 
millions. He is in love with Anna- 
bella Fair, a charming debutante. 
On the eve of taking her to an avia- 
tion meet where he hopes to pro- 
pose to her, his only suit of clothes, 
still unpaid for, is seized by the 



tailor. Nathaniel feigns sickness 
in an attempt to solve the situation. 
Annabella, worried at the news, 
calls on him, chaperoned by her 
maiden Aunt Caroline, who tortures 
the young man with numerous 
home remedies. The gathering is 
interrupted by the rent collector, 
and poor Nathaniel becomes in- 
volved in his lies and mixes up his 
ailments hopelessly. Undaunted, 
however, he engineers a very hu- 
morous romance between Smith, 
the untutored rent collector, and 
Aunt Caroline, whose love-making- 
is at once enlightening and ridicu- 
lous. Then, getting Annabella 
alone, Nathaniel proposes ; and she, 
being moved by pity as well as love, 
accepts him. Word comes that 
Uncle Henry has died, leaving Na- 
thaniel the entire fortune. The 
tailor's boy returns the suit, both 
couples announce their engagement, 
and the play ends happily as they 
start at last for the aviation meet. 

The cast of the Morality Play 
was : 

A Soul Mr. F. B. Comstock 

A Presence George W. Brewster 

The cast and setting of "An Af- 
flicted Man" were as follows : 
Nathaniel Jenkins 

Donald Murchie 
Mr. Smith Thomas E. Hawes 

Jeems, an English butler 

Charles D. Gowing 
Dun, a tailor's boy 

James W. Henning 
Annabella Fair Robert B. Gowing 



44 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Caroline Fair, her aunt 

Huntington Miller 
Scene : in the apartments of Na- 
thaniel Jenkins. 

Stage Manager John L. Rakestraw 
Electrician Frank O. Reed 

Staere Hand Herbert S. Smith 




Photograph by R. G. Sagebeer 

"A SOUL AND A PRE.SLNCL" 

In the Morality Play Mr. Corn- 
stock's experienced stage presence, 
coupled with George Brewster's 
natural ability and excellent dic- 
tion, made a production of remark- 
able finish. 

The farce gave opportunity for 
more varied character work. "Bob" 
Gowing, the leading lady, was un- 
usually graceful and good-looking. 
He interpreted the part excellently, 



and though coy at times, never fell 
into the common error of silliness. 
Donald Murchie made an enthusi- 
astic and persistent young lover. 
Huntington Miller's interpretation 
of the maiden aunt was everything 
that could be asked for. Her con- 
versation with Mr. Smith, for whom 
she was obviously angling, were ex- 
tremely amusing. "To m m y " 
Hawes, in his role of rent collector, 
showed the proper bourgeois lack of 
education, mingled with bluff and 
clouds of cigar smoke. Charles 
Gowing, with his entertaining cock- 
ney accent, made a splendid butler. 
"Jimmy" Henning, always a suc- 
cessful negro, did the part of the 
colored tailor's boy to perfection. 

The parody on the "Afflicted 
Man" which was produced the fol- 
lowing week can go without much 
comment ; the only notables were 
"Bob" Gowing's burlap petting 
shirt and Huntington Miller's con- 
ception of the society dreadnought. 

A week later the Long Walk 
Stay-at-Homes, working under dif- 
ficulties, treated the returning 
trampers to a unique program. 
The Henning brothers, along with 
other histrionic notables, produced 
some real thrills in "An Old-Time 
Melodrama," and "The Hanging of 
the Rat." Mr. Watt's Punch and 
Judy show was very ingeniously 
constructed, and the clever lines 
must have taken many a long hour 
of thought in the commissary. A 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



45 



snappy skit by "Bob" Gowing, 
George Brewster, and Huntington 
Miller was also well received. The 
rustic finale by Messrs. Thompson 
and Comstock, savoring strongly of 
the barnyard and the sawdust box, 
contained some choice bits of local 
satire. 

The inter-dormitory competition, 
which again closed the season, was 
a decided success. Mr. Comstock's 
Dana troupe romped home an easy 
winner with "The Three Brass Bed- 
ouins." Typically Oriental from 



the heroine's "mop of hair" to the 
smiling "smackers" that undulated 
as they crooned strange incoheren- 
cies, it captivated the audience. 
Worthy of high commendation also 
were King Bluebeard II, and Mr. 
Watt's play, "The Haunted House." 
Thus closed the season in the 
playhouse. The outlook for the 
future is most encouraging. With 
our splendid equipment the possi- 
bilities are unlimited both for train- 
ing and amusement. 

Richard A. Kimball. 



THE SWIMS, 1922 



Anthony 

Banks 

Beebe 

Brewster 

Campbell 

Clarke, J. A 

Curtis 

Galbraith 

Grant 

Harding, F. 

Hart 

Hawes, E. T. 

Hawes, T. E. 

Hollister, H. G. 



A. 



HALF-MILE SWIMS 



Howland 
Hughes 
King 

Lee, A. R. 
Lee, I. L. 
Leonard, F. N. 
Lihme 

Lindsay, E. C. 
Lindsay, J. F. 
Marshall 
Munson 
Murchie, D. 
Phelps 



Porter 

Rakestraw, E. H. 
San ford, L. J. 
San ford, W. F. 
Scull, T. C. 
Stewart 
Townsend 
Tracy, L. E. 
Tracy, WW. 
Vetterlein 
Win stead 
Woodward 
Wyeth 



MILE SWIMS 



Beckwith, 38:29 2-5 
Lee, I. L., 46:8 
Murchie, D., 
Tracy, W. W., 36:30 
Vetterlein, 35:2 



4 6 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



life-saving: an added 
Precaution 



One topic of discussion and argu- 
ment throughout every season is: 
How can we improve our system of 
water supervision, how can we near- 
est approach the obliteration of all 
chances of catastrophe in the water? 

This season it was generally felt 
that a greater effort should be ex- 
erted beyond constant supervision 
and careful, constant instruction in 
swimming, rowing and paddling. 
Each individual boy must be made 
to feel capable not only of caring 
for himself but of "carrying more 
than his own weight" in this de- 
partment of activity, as in wider 
spheres. 

The Life-Saving Corps of the 
American Red Cross has established 
chapters throughout the country, 
giving demonstrations, instruction, 
and tests, and awarding certificates 
of efficiency. As it is necessary for 
the establishment of one of these 
chapters to have the tests given by 
an agent of the Red Cross, we have 
felt that we could do the work, fol- 
lowing their instructions, without 
formally establishing a chapter. 

Since there were in Camp, among 
the many expert swimmers, some 
who had passed the Red Cross tests, 
demonstrations and instructions 
were given to the entire Camp of the 
more important carry methods of 
assisting a tired or unconscious per- 



son in the water, of breaking the 
grips of a drowning person, and of 
the best method of carrying on land. 
The Schaeffer Method of artificial 
respiration was carefully demon- 
strated and explained. Every boy 
has practised the breaks, the carries, 
and the method of artificial respira- 
tion until a degree of efficiency has 
been attained. The passing of these 
tests has been made one of the re- 
quirements for the granting of 
Canoe Privilege. 

J. M. Crosman. 



CANOEING 



Due to an increasing lack of in- 
terest, canoeing at Pasquaney has 
become in the past few years almost 
a lost art. Canoeing is an art. It 
requires months of practice and ex- 
perience in all kinds of weather and 
under varied conditions before one 
can become an expert in this art. 
In order to stimulate interest in 
canoeing and to enable a boy to 
learn how to handle a canoe, a ser- 
ies of tests, thoroughly covering all 
conditions, has been organized this 
year and is required of every boy be- 
fore he can obtain "Canoe Privi- 
lege." There is a distinction in 
meaning between the terms "Canoe 
Permission" and "Canoe Privilege." 
A boy must first have swum a half- 
mile before he can receive "Canoe 
Permission." He may then go out 
in a canoe within the triangular 



THE PASQUANBY ANNUAL 



47 



area known as "Bounds." When, 
in addition, he has passed his canoe 
tests, learned such fundamentals in 
life saving as are deemed essential, 
and been passed upon by the Coun- 
cil as being mature in judgment, 
he attains to the honor of "Canoe 
Privilege." He is then permitted, 
in company with another boy who 
has Canoe Privilege, to go any- 
where upon the lake within one- 
quarter of a mile from the shore. 
This privilege is, as may readily be 
seen, a great honor, which has 
fallen to the lot of only four boys 
this year: Donald Murchie, David 
Hinchman, "Pete" Lillard, and Ed- 
ward Berwind. 

The canoe tests mentioned above 
demand of a boy that he know how 
to paddle correctly in all conditions 
of weather and water ; that he be 



able to climb into a floating canoe 
from the water and know how to 
stay by his canoe if it is upturned ; 
that he know the proper way to 
bring an upturned canoe to shore ; 
and that he be capable of emptying 
his canoe in deep water. 

At first glance these tests may ap- 
pear to be too stringent; but they 
can be met readily by the average 
thirteen-year-old boy if once he has 
been shown the way. Of the ninety- 
five boys at Pasquaney this season, 
seventy have swum a half-mile or a 
mile. Of this number twenty-six 
have been able to pass the canoe 
tests. It is hoped that next season 
every boy will be given the tests and 
that in future years every Pasquaney 
boy will know how to handle a 
canoe properly. 

W. S. Scull, 2nd. 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

THE. VICTORIOUS SENIOR BASEBALL TEAM 



4 8 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 








GAS£0A*-£- 




S '^ i /^ s~t / a/ q. 




C/?eoJ 




Q<so i r~s 




<?"*'*/ c^w<^. 



-WECK'/REfT- 



.Sketch by J. C. Thompson 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



49 



THE WALKS 



What a magnificent opportunity 
we have here at Pasquaney to get 
away from the hard, hot, monoto- 
nous thoroughfares of civilization 
and strike out across upland pas- 
tures and follow winding trails 
through an ever-changing sylvan 
paradise ! We are indeed lucky to 
have this close association with the 
inexpressible beauty of nature. 
Somehow it stirs up all that is good 
and fine in us and makes us better 
men. 

Let us bring up in our memories 
the wonderful walks we had to- 
gether. Let us recall that first Sat- 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

ASSEMBLING FOR A WALK 

urday when so many of us walked 
five and a half miles up "The Lane" 
to the "Barnard Estate" and back 
home by the road along the lake in 
a drizzling rain. Do you remem- 
ber how jubilant we all were, and 
will you ever forget those curious 
steers that kept poking their heads 
out at us? 



The next Saturday, you remem- 
ber, not quite so many of us went 
up Clement s Hill. That was a 
very interesting and old part of the 
country we went through back in 
the hills. Wasn't that a terrible 
thunderstorm we ran into when we 
w T ere having lunch at the summit? 
Mr. Ned and "Miff" were great fun, 
weren't they? What a soaking we 
got on the way back, and how 
stupid it was stumbling through 
that bog ! I think we won't forget 
how good was the taste of the hot 
coffee which we had in Dana when 
we reached home. 

We started out the following Sat- 
urday for Mt. Crosby. Nobody 
knew the way very well. Conse- 
quently we got lost in the woods 
and never really did get to the top 
because it was growing so late in 
the day. Wasn't the descent 

through the woods good fun? And 
I bet we won't soon forget how de- 
licious "Fuzzie's" lemonade tasted. 
You all had your share of jokes on 
me for losing the way ; it was rather 
dumb, and I will have to do better 
next time. 

The next Saturday we had the 
best walk of all. You can't beat 
that W r eltons Falls walk. And we 
surely were blessed with a perfect 
day. Have you ever had anything 
that you vigorously enjoyed more 
than the wonderful shower under 
the falls, the "languid laziness of 
the limpid lakelet" (!), and then 



5Q 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



the sun bath and lunch on the 
rocks? Let us always keep this 
vivid in our memories: it will help 
when we are wilting - away in the 
city. 

This covers briefly all of the or- 
ganized walks except the rollicking" 
ramble which those who were later 
to comprise the Long Walk party 
took on the Saturday after Water 
Sports. About the Long W'alk it- 
self you can read elsewhere. It was 
in every way a glorious experience 
and great success. 



In closing, there is only commen- 
dation to be spoken for the cheerful 
spirit and buoyant enthusiasm 
shown by all who had to do with 
the walks this year. There was so 
much "endurance, helpfulness, and 
cheer" displayed by many that it 
was only after the most painstak- 
ing discrimination and careful con- 
sideration that the Thomas Hike 
Cup was awarded to one who 
seemed to have a little something - 
on all the rest — Donald Murchie. 
Donald D. Kennedy. 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

THE. SHOWLR BATH AT WE.LTON5 FALLS 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



5i 



ILo n 9; Maik 








-^iv. 








5ketch by J. C. Thompson 



THE LONG WALK HISTORY, 1922 



THE PARTY 

Counsellors : "Don" Kennedy, 
Chauncey Buell, "Marney" Cros- 
man, "Dick" Kimball, and Barclay 
Scull. 

Boys: "Phil" Beckwith, Boyl- 
ston Campbell, "Charlie" Clarke, 
Eliot Codman, "Johnny" Curtis, 
"Steve" Davol, "Tom" Eliot, "Mac" 
Galbraith, "Charlie" Gowing, "Bob" 
Gray, Francis Harding, "Tommy" 
Hawes, "Dave" Hinchman, "Jack" 
Hinchman, John Howland, Thorn 
King, "Pete" Lillard, Maurice Make- 
peace, "Thrus" Morton, "Don" 
Murchie, Guy Murchie, "Eddie" 
Ritchie, "Bill" Sanford, Telford 



Taylor, "Bolt" Winpenny, Walter 
Wyeth. 

Monday, August 7 9 miles 

Dark, heavy thunderclouds hung 
over the hills of Newfound Lake, 
clouds foreboding rain. To one ac- 
quainted with Pasquaney tradi- 
tions this would mean one thing and 
one thing only : some kind of a 
camping expedition was about to 
set out! 

Sure enough. There, assembled 
before the barn, were we Long 
Walkers, thirty strong, waiting only 
until the rain should start in real 
earnest. We had not long to wait, 
for soon the rain was falling "in 
showers prime," and we were on the 



52 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



hack road to Ashland. After com- 
ing out on the main road we cov- 
ered some distance hefore the lunch- 
ing place was reached. Here we 
dried our rain-soaked clothes by the 
sun that obligingly came out for the 
purpose. In a toss-hall game that 
served as dessert Boylston Campbell 
figured prominently. After lunch, 
and a long and arduous march, 
we passed through the business dis- 
trict of Ashland. From here "Don" 
Kennedy, our leader, conducted us 
along the shores of a pretty little 
river for more than an hour, until 
we saw, as we supposed, a suitable 
place for a swim. But just as we 
were about ready for the dip, Mr. 
Kennedy hailed an empty motor- 
boat which, to our surprise, con- 
sented to convey us all to our des- 
tination on Squam Lake. We ar- 
rived there safely and that night, 
thanks to another thunder storm, 
we sought refuge in a vacant 
"hotel" adjoining our camping 
ground. 

Tuesday, August 8 19 miles 
Next morning we awoke much re- 
freshed by our comfortable nap on 
the soft pine boards of the "hotel" 
floor ! The weather was clear and 
cool and altogether perfect for the 
long road walk which lay before us. 
While we were traversing the 
pretty, hilly district back of the lake, 
Mr. Jackson's Ford overtook us, 
bringing letters and Thorn King. 
The reinforced party then passed 



through Centre Sandwich and sev- 
eral miles of sandy, rolling country 
before it came to Bear Camp Pond, 
where we stopped for lunch and a 
swim. Another long, tiring hike 
[hat afternoon made the ice cream 
parlor in Tamworth seem like the 
Biltmore tea room. The encamp- 
ment for the night was a mile or so 
beyond Tamworth, on an upland 
pasture, which made an ideal camp- 
ing spot. During one of Bob's fa- 
mous Long Walk suppers a delega- 
tion of rustics strolled in to hear us 
do a little systematic grand opera 
work. After which we retired, 
much exhausted. 




Photograph by J. B. Campbell 

"AS WE. GO MARCHING!" 

Wednesday, August 9 18 miles 
Next morning we were up early, 
prepared for the worst. In order 
to get a head start, "Don" Kennedy 
invented the alibi of "buying some 
light sweaters in Tamworth." How- 
ever, the main body soon overtook 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



53 



him. On the shores of Lake Cho- 
corua, lying at the base of the 
mountain, we met Myles Baker and 
"Lanty'" Sims who had come ex- 
pressly to accompany us up the 
slope of Chocorui. The Hammond 
Trail led us to the summit in two 
and a half hours, exclusive of the 
time spent in inhaling the "pop" 
which was for sale in the fire war- 
den's house, a few hundred feet be- 
low the top. The view was ex- 
quisite. Under the blue dome of 
the sky whole chains of lakes and 
great ranges of mountains stretched 
before our eyes. We could see, be- 
sides the magnificent Presidential 
Range, mountains and lakes in 
Maine, and the Atlantic Ocean, far, 
far away. We descended Chocorua 
by the precipitous Brook Trail, so- 
called apparently because it fol- 
lowed the bed of the brook most of 
the way down. At the foot of the 
mountain we parted with Myles and 
"Lanty" and soon were well on our 
way towards Wonalancet, where 
Bob and "Bunk" were awaiting us. 
Here Mr. Waldon's kindness had 
provided an excellent camping place 
which included all conveniences, in- 
cluding plenty of ice water. It was 
a paradise for the bug-lover ! 

Thursday, August 10 

21 miles for some ; 
15 miles for others 

The supreme test had come at 
last. During the preceding days 
our cheerful "big brothers" had 




Photograph by J. B. Campbell 

MT. CHOCORUA 

been foretelling that "the worst day 
was Thursday." And to make it 
even more ominous, an awesome 
division of forces was announced by 
Mr. Kennedy : one party, under the 
lame and limping "Marney" Cros- 
man and "Barcle" Scull, were to go 
to Squam Lake direct, while the 
other, composed of the tough and 
chafeless element, were to climb 
Mt. Whiteface as well. Just after 
leaving camp we passed our host's 
house in Wonalancet, and there we 
were able to see the team and dogs 
with which he had won the inter- 
national dog-team race the previous 
winter. We struck Myles and 
"Lanty" and the trail in good sea- 
son. At eleven-thirty we were at 
the summit, enjoying one of the 
high spots of the walk. The view, 
quite different from that obtained 
from Chocorua, was very inspiring. 
Although not as extensive in sweep, 
the visible beauty was concentrated, 
double strength. After about 



54 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 




Photograph by J. B. Campbell 

RLADY FOR ANOTHLR DAY'5 HIKE. 



twenty minutes of aesthetic enjoy- 
ment we descended as rapidly 
as "Dick" Kimball would permit. 
We lunched near the base, on the 
side of a "burn" that wasn't hot at 
all ! Then commenced the long 
hike to the camping ground on 
Squam Lake. Many times the rear 
guard waxed and waned before we 
reached Centre Sandwich and the 
general store. From this choice 
spot we staggered to the lake and 
entered camp in a burst of song, to 
find all prepared by the non-White- 
face party. A Bob Williams hash 
dinner was enjoyed by all without 
demur. Thus ended the much pro- 
claimed "hard day." 

Friday, August 11 7 miles 

After arising, the party enjoyed a 
stiff and formal breakfast, at which 



"Marney" Crosman, "The Old Man 
of the Mountains," announced his 
intention of riding on the wagon. 
After this delightful meal we took 
an enjoyable joy ride on the same 
pleasure craft which before had 
taken us across Squam Lake. Its 
opportune appearance was another 
miracle of coincidence, according to 
"Don" Kennedy ! Before we real- 
ized it we were in the Holderness 
"Souvenir Store," enjoying ginger 
ale and ice cream sodas, and franti- 
cally borrowing money to pay for 
them. From Holderness to our 
camping spot, a short distance out- 
side of Plymouth, seemed but a 
trifle to our calloused members. In 
fact we had the entire afternoon for 
rest. But everyone played "cat" or 
a strenuous game of Prisoner's 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



55 




Photograph by F. O. Reed 

THE. WALK TO CLLMLNT'5 HILL 



Base to work up a fitting appetite 
for the wonderful dinner that Mr. 
Ned had provided for us. Chicken 
and corn-on-the-cob received a 
warm and hearty reception. All in 
all, the dinner was the end of a per- 
fect day. 

Saturday, August 12 9y 2 miles 

This was a day of "slicking up." 
Everyone pruned his feathers. 
Thruston Morton recklessly cele- 
brated by allowing to escape from 



his blankets the animal heat which 
had been imprisoned there since the 
first night. Even "Bolt" Winpenny 
combed his curling locks ! All 
these tokens would have convinced 
the most casual observer that some- 
thing was up. And, sure enough, 
at eleven o'clock the carefully 
graded procession rolled out of 
camp and, at a rapid gait, stepped 
oft towards Plymouth. As the 
handsome body swung down the 
main street of the metropolis, the 



56 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



crowds pushed and tugged at the 

hempen bonds that held them in 
check, as they fought for a glimpse 
of our faces ! Such a reception 
could only he paralleled by the din- 
ner which awaited our heroic group. 
We were prompt in our arrival at 
the Pemigewasset, where we were 
warmly greeted by Mr. Ned. Then 
alter letters and stories had been ex- 
changed, all advanced upon the fa- 
mous Long Walk dinner, given 
through the courtesy of an alumnus, 
thus hitting high spot Number 

Three An hour afterwards 

we began our toilsome waddle 
homeward, our senses dulled by the 
huge improbabilities of Mr. Nicho- 
las Carter. But even this sedative 



was denied us when we struck the 
main road and we were forced to 
face the bald fact of a four-mile-an- 
hour jog straight to the portals of 
Camp Pasquaney. There, however, 
we were received with a tremendous 
ovation from the worshipful Stay- 
at-Homes which we attempted to 
return by rendering our rollicking 
Long Walk Song (Mr. Richard A. 
Kimball, Composer). Soon we 
were back in the bosom of the 
family ; and thus ended the Great 
Adventure of 1922, one of the most 
successful Long Walks in the his- 
tory of Pasquaney. 

C. D. Gowing, 
Donald Murchie. 




Photograph by a Friend 

THL LONG WALKERS ARRIVL AT "THL PLMIGLWASSLT 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 57 



THE LONG WALK SONG, 1922 



(Tune: "As We Go Marching") 



Here's to Marney Crosman, with blistered feet and toes: 

He's called Old Man of the Mountain wherever the Long Walk goes; 

At tramping o'er the rocky roads his luck is simply punk: 

And it breaks his heart to climb in the cart and ride with Bob and Bunk. 

(Chorus) 

As we go marching, and Tommy Hawes begins to P-L-A-Y, 

You can hear us shouting: How many miles are we going to walk today? 

II 

Here's to Charlie Chauncey Buell of reputation wide: 

The people always ask for him all over the countryside; 

The farmers and the farmers' wives — they come from miles aroun', 

For they love to stare at his golden hair as he marches through the town. 

Ill 

Here's to little Barclay Scull: he's always in the game: 

He runs a spike into his foot and walks on just the same; ' 

As he plods along the highway, you often hear him sigh, 

For as he tramps he lamps the vamps as they go passing by. 

IV 

Here's to Donald Kennedy, the leader of our bunch: 

He buys us jam to eat with our ham whenever we stop for lunch; 

He's always very thoughtful, his spirits ever staunch, 

And instead of walking us round the lakes he puts us in a launch. 

V 

Here's to Dickie Kimball, the human graphophone: 

When he opens his face, we hit up the pace and let him walk alone; 

He wears a pair of three-league boots that weigh about a ton: 

So he sits in the pines and makes up rhymes as we go marching on. ' 

R. A. K. 



58 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



THE CARDIGAN WALK 



The Junior Long Walk, as it 
might be called, has come to be a 
regular part of the summer's pro- 
gram of walks, after the precedent 
set by Mr. Buell's very successful 
trip of last year. So after lunch on 
Wednesday, August 9th, a group of 
twelve walkers — for they were 
those who had just missed being se- 
lected for the Long Walk — started 
on a two-day trip to Mt. Cardigan. 

Our party was made up of the fol- 
lowing: "Dick" Berresford, George 
Brewster, "Dan" Codman, "Charlie" 
Goodrich, "Jim" Henning, Ivy Lee, 
"Randy" Lee, "Coggin" Lindsay, 
"Hunt" Miller, Frank Reed, the 
Doctor, and the writer. After hav- 
ing been ferried across the lake in 
the "Recreation" we began our hike, 
with packs on our backs, up the old 
Post Road between Bear Mountain 
and Sugarloaf. It was a clear, cold 
day, and the walking was most en- 
joyable. Coming out into the open 
fields we made a side excursion to 
Tilting Rock that proved to be most 
interesting. At this point our 
"Doc," carrying his red blankets on 
the outside of his blanket roll, found 
he was being stampeded by a few 
too-curious heifers. We proceeded 
up the valley and camped that night 
at the Welton farm, where we had 
a refreshing though very cold dip 



in Weltons Falls. Just as we were 
turning in we were lighted to bed 
by a clear full moon coming up o;er 
the trees in the eastern horizon. 

The morrow dawned bright and 
clear, and we were away to an early 
start after a frigid plunge in the 
Falls and a good breakfast. We 
went across country and up the 
mountain by the eastern spur, over 
the top of Firescrew, and reached 
the summit at noon. What a gor- 
geous view greeted us there ! We 
could see on all sides for miles, and 
as we lunched we were inspired by 
the beauty and grandeur of the New 
Hampshire hills. We were given a 
thrill which added even more to the 
pleasure of our trip. A quick de- 
scent by the Ackerman Trail set us 
well on our way home ; and at five 
o'clock we again boarded the "Rec- 
reation" at Mr. Jackson's boathouse 
for our return to Camp. 

It was with some regret that we 
realized that the trip was all over ; 
but everyone felt that he had had a 
wonderful time and would have a 
most pleasant remembrance of the 
experience. Each boy was a Long 
Walker in that he entirely measured 
up in "Helpfulness, Endurance, and 
Cheer:" more pleasant walking 
companions could not be found. 
John P. Bankson, Jr. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



59 



THE CHRONICLE OF THE STAY-AT-HOMES 



The Long Walkers arose on Mon- 
day morning, August 7th, to greet 
a bleak and rainy day. With spir- 
its high, however, they set out 
about nine o'clock, being speeded 
on by the customary cheers. Soon 
after they had departed, a fresh 
downpour of rain drove us Stay-at- 
Homes to cover, and our hearts 
went out in pity to the bold hikers. 
Games of "nigger baby" were or- 
ganized in Birch and Dana before 
and after soak to keep our thoughts 
from the melancholy weather. (No, 
children, Amos was not present.) 
After dinner the usual rainy-day 
ping-pong competitions were staged 
in Baird Hall, while "Charlie" 
Townsend conducted some wres- 
tling in the playhouse until this 
finally deteriorated into an ordinary 
free-for-all amid cries of "Pile on 
Charlie !" After the mangled bod- 
ies had been disengaged and cleared 
away, Messrs. Comstock and 
Thompson received candidates for 
the Stay-at-Home entertainment, 
for which there was a goodly turn- 
out. At campfire Mr. Spaeth read 
a few "Uncle Remus" stories. As 
for visitors, Owen Lindsay left in 
the morning and "Billy" Guild, '05, 
took his place in the afternoon. 

On Tuesday morning Mr. Jack- 
son conveyed the recently ill Thorn 
King to the Long Walkers and left 



him safe in their hands. The rest 
of the morning passed uneventfully 
except for a play rehearsal. But 
after rest period the tennis courts 
were made ready for active use, and 
Charlie Townsend attracted a large 
and vigorous following to the base- 
ball field for a rough-and-tumble 
scramble with a football. A war 
canoe party, under the guidance of 
"Udo" Bradley, made a trip to San- 
born's Beach. After Taps Myles 
Baker, counsellor in 1919-1920, ar- 
rived for an overnight stay. 







Photograph by F. O. Reed 

THE. CARDIGAN WALKLRS AT TILTING ROCK 

Soon after breakfast on Wednes- 
day morning "Lanty" Sims and 
Myles Baker left in the latter's au- 
tomobile with the avowed purpose 



6o 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



of climbing Mt. Washington and 

other peaks. Later in the morning 
the younger members of our com- 
munity set out in three camping 
parties for brief stays at Mayhew's, 
Hornet's, and Cliff. The camp 
was still further depleted after lunch 
by the departure of "Jack" Bank- 
son and "Doc" Davidson with ten 
boys for an overnight hike to Wel- 
ton's Falls and Mt. Cardigan. The 
afternoon was taken up for the rem- 
nant by baseball, tennis, and an- 
other canoe excursion to Sanborn's. 
"Eddie" Dearden, '19, dropped in 
on us for a few hours. After sup- 
per Percy Owen entertained us in 
the playhouse with a gilt-edge radio 
concert. 

Tennis was largely the order on 
Thursday morning. "Bunce" Corn- 
stock, of Yale tennis fame, gave in- 
struction to some of the untutored 
in this sport. Baseballers were 
again active in the afternoon. Later 
the Cardigan walkers returned with 
a happy experience in memory and 
many tales to tell. Supper was re- 
plete with stories of old buggies, 
porcupines, apples, cold water, steep 
mountains, wandering cows, "Wah- 
kee-nahs," old ladies, little boys, — 
and "Doc" Davidson ! "Fred" 

Gamage, T2, was a visitor during 
the day. 

Our next day's narrative is con- 
cerned with tennis matches and ten- 
nis instruction, half-mile swims, 
and the return of the midget camp- 



ing parties. The majority of the 
young'uns came back visibly flushed 
with what they considered their 
success and triumph on the parties, 
but a few appeared in a dazed and 
sublunary state. Suffice it to say 
that there were many incredulous 
anecdotes retailed by the counsel- 
lors. The afternoon passed as 
quietly as along the Potomac ; and 
at campfire "Chick" Guild (who al- 
ready was a boy again) read an 
animal story by Ernest Thompson 
Seton (or Seton Thompson, as you 
choose). During prayers "Spud" 
Murphy, '20, arrived and added his 
name to the tale of visitors for the 
week. 

And now, children, we have ar- 
rived at the last day of this history. 
In the morning the lake might have 
been seen to be much churned up, 
partly because numerous campers 
were swimming their half-miles and 
triangles, but especially because 
"Joe" Vetterlein was tearing over a 
mile course in 35 minutes, 2 sec- 
onds, this being the season's record 
to date. During rest period in 
Dana "Chick" Guild discoursed on 
radio. Later in the afternoon the 
Long Walkers' duffle bags arrived 
and were unpacked by willing 
hands. Just before supper the 
Walkers themselves appeared, all 
seeming to be in the pink of condi- 
tion. They struck a joyful note in 
our hearts by singing so merrily 
their little wise saws about the 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



61 



counsellors who had accompanied 
them. (It might also be mentioned 
that they achieved more close har- 
mony in the chorus than had been 
heard about Camp all season.) At 
supper "Don" Kennedy gave us all 
a detailed account of the whole 
walk, which was not only interest- 
ing and humorous but also con- 
vinced us that the 1922 Long Walk- 
had been a huge success. 

After the usual duties the talented 
Stay-at-Home performers reeled off 
their several acts in the playhouse. 
Every one had at least one good 
laugh in it, which is saying much. 
Our field of knowledge was then 



widened by interesting moving pic- 
tures on "War Dogs," "Mounting 
Museum Groups," and "The Virgin 
Islands." Much hilarity also greeted 
Charlie Chaplin as he straddled the 
escalator in "The Floorwalker ;" but 
that scene had nothing at all on 
"Bunce" Comstock's-Jack Thomp- 
son's thigh-slapping, mop-swabbing 
act. The latter took the proverbial 
cake, far and away. 

Silent prayers, followed soon 
after by audible snores, brought the 
week of the Stay-at-Homes — and its 
history — to a close. 

R. C. Berresford. 



THE LONG WALK CAMPING PARTIES 
(August 8th to 11th) 



CAMP BUSTAGUT 



The Scent: Cliff Island. 

The Council : Messrs. "Udo" 
Bradley and "Bill" Scull. 

The Party: "Rod" Beebe, "Jack" 
Clarke, George Grant, "J ac k" Hard- 
ing, "Tony" Munson, "Jimmie" 
Sanford, "Ted" Scull, and "Larry" 
Tracy. 

The Statistics : 
Best Camper 

Clarke and Grant (no decision) 



Most Helpful 
Most Cheerful 
Cow 
Laziest 
The Place : 



"Larry" Tracy 

George Grant 

Ditto 

"Jimmie" Sanford 

Hornets Cove. 




Photograph by T. H. Hinchman. Jr. 
"A K1DDILS KAMP" 



CAMP WAGGED-WASCALS 

Conducted by: Prof. "Dick" 

Sagebeer and Mr. Harry Hinchman. 

The Crowd: "Bobby" Buell, 



62 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



"Timmy" Day, "Dicky" deRham, 
"Dave" Hart, "Eddie" Hawes, "Er- 
nie" Levering, "Billy" Winstead, 
"Charlie" Wood. 

The votes : 
Best Camper 
Most Helpful 
Most Cheerful 
Sea Horse 
Pretty Boy 
Cow 



"Billy" Winstead 

"Eddie" Hawes 

also "Eddie" Hawes 

"Eddie" again 

"Ernie" Levering 

"Timmie" Day 



CAMP UPANDATTEM 



The Locality : Mayhew's Island. 



The Guardians: "Father John" 
Spaeth and "Phoebe" Phelps. 

The Wards: "California" An- 
thony, "Ted" Church, Felix 
Hughes, "Judge" Hoyt, "Junior" 
Jefferson, "Billy" Townsend, and 
"Harp" Woodward. 

The awards : 
Best Camper Harper W T oodward 
Most Helpful "Junior" JefTerson 
Most Cheerful likewise "Junior" 
Water Rat "Billy" Townsend 

Camp Misfit The same "Billy." 




OUR "CHAPEL IN THE PINES' 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



63 




SOME. MORE. 5NAP-5HOT5! 



6 4 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



ATHLETICS 



ROWING 

The rowing season of 1922 was 
unique in a number of different 
ways. Rain for the first days of 
Camp hindered b.nd activities and 
centered interest chiefly on rowing, 
so that two crews were enabled to 
establish a new record, as it were, 
by getting on the water the first 
regular day of Camp. There were 
six boys, who had rowed in races 
the year before, available to form the 
nucleus of these crews. The call 
for further candidates was issued 
as soon as possible, and sixty oars- 
men and coxswains answered. 

Then there followed four weeks 
of "tubbing." At the same time, 
two Senior crews were practising 
whenever the numerous other Camp 
activities allowed. They made such 
satisfactory progress that it was de- 
cided to have the two Senior crews 
for the final race of the season 
picked before Water Sports and 
trained as rival crews ; and, instead 
of the usual Exhibition Crew, the 
W r ater Sports guests were to be 
treated to an exhibition brush of ap- 
proximately two hundred yards. 
All would have gone well had not 
an outrigger broken on the day be- 
fore Water Sports. The result w r as 
that each crew had to row sepa- 



rately. In spite of the rough water 
both boats showed remarkable 
smoothness in form and blade work 
and deserved great credit for the 
fine spectacle they presented. 

W r ith the mid-season mark 
passed, all settled down to the task 
of preparing for the final test. The 
Senior crews were selected ; but th ; 
Juniors were a problem. It was 
not until after the Long Walk that 
they w r ere ready to go out in shells, 
and even then the doctor's anxiety 
to prevent overdoing cut several of 
the most promising boys from the 
squad. The first time trial on Au- 
gust 19th showed too great a differ- 
ence in the speed of the two boats, 
so that a change was necessary. 
The final selection was not made 
until the Tuesday before the race; 
but the excellent time for the half- 
mile recorded on that day was an 
encouragement and a reward to the 
conscientious work of the whole 
squad. 

Then with settled minds, all 
awaited the day of the races. But 
August 26th was destined to be re- 
membered as a day of upsets. At 
lunch time it became evident that 
"Dave" Hinchman, Number 2 in the 
Birch Junior boat, was in no condi- 
tion to row. A hurried consulta- 
tion on the part of the coaches re- 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



65 



vealed the appalling truth that the 
first three substitutes for the posi- 
tion were unavailable, two being ab- 
sent from Camp and the third laid 
up with a bad knee. The only man 
left was John Howland, who had 
never been in a shell before ! 

It was indeed an anxious moment 
as the two Junior crews rowed 
down to the start. After consider- 
able jockeying for positions both 
boats got away to a fast start. But 
on the tenth stroke Telford Taylor 
jumped his seat, and a new start 
had to be made. This time Dana 
rushed into the lead, rowing the 
terrifically high stroke of 46, while 
Phelps held his crew to a 32. As 
the boats approached the quarter- 
mile mark, Dana appeared three- 
quarters of a length ahead ; but here 
Harding's killing pace began to tell. 
Number 3 caught a crab, allowing 
Birch to draw up on even terms. 
A hundred yards farther on an- 
other crab put Birch in the lead. 
Thereafter Birch steadily pulled 
away from the wilting Dana boat 
and finished five seconds ahead in 
the fast time of 3 :07 4-5. "Alex" 
Phelps should be given great credit 
for his perfect generalship in keep- 
ing his beat low throughout the 
race, with an eye to the experience 
of the men behind him, and an ap- 
preciation of the benefit of a stiff 
following breeze. Enough cannot 
be said in praise of the spirit of a 
crew which, supposedly crippled be- 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

READY FOR CRLW PRACTICE 

yond hope, could still pull itself suf- 
ficiently together to row a superb 
race and come within two seconds 
of the Camp record for the distance. 
The other stroke rowed his first 
race in keeping with his tempera- 
ment, quick and impulsive. 

Excitement ran high as the Senior 
crews lined up for the start of their 
race. Both got off beautifully at a 
36 stroke. As they swung into 
their racing pace, Birch was leading 
by six feet. At the quarter-mile 
mark they were on even terms, 
fighting it out stroke for stroke. At 
the half-mile the flags came down 
a fraction of a second apart, to the 
advantage of Birch. But still it 
was anybody's race. Four hundred 
yards from the finish Eliot raised 
his beat and gradually Birch drew 
ahead. It looked as if he had caught 
his rival napping. But he had not 
counted on Dana's fighting spirit. 
Soon Sanford challenged. Up went 
the stroke to the sharp appeal of the 
coxswain, "You can catch them yet, 



66 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



but you've got to move!" In eight 
strokes the boats were again even, 
with five more to go. Both were 
catching exactly together. The 
crew that could get in just a frac- 
tion of a stroke ahead would win. 
But both were rowing their very 
best and drove over the finish line 
in a dead heat. They were timed at 
4 :25, the second fastest time ever 
made at Camp. It had been a bat- 
tle of wits between perfectly 
matched crews. In such a race 

there could be no outstanding star, 
for all shone brilliantly. 

With the crew season over, the 
boy to whom the Yale Cup should 
be awarded for "advancing the in- 



terests of rowing at Pasquaney" 
had to be selected. After consid- 
erable discussion the choice was 
finally narrowed down to two boys, 
a coxswain and an oarsman. Of the 
two, one seemed to stand out more 
in leadership, in initiative, in doing 
helpful jobs, and in constant cheer- 
fulness. It was, therefore, decided 
that, for the first time in the Camp's 
history, the cup should be given to 
a coxswain, for two years, captain of 
a senior crew, Richard C. Berres- 
ford, with the highest commenda- 
tion for his conscientious work to 
William F. Sanford. 

R. B. Scull, 

Coach. 




Photograph by U. T. Bradley 

FINALU, SUB-JUNIOR DOUBLES 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



6 7 



TENNIS 



We were unfortunate this year in 
having pretty much continual rain 
tor the first two weeks, which are 
after all one of the best times for 
tennis, since the other activities 
haven't yet gotten under way and 
don't demand so much of the boy's 
time. 

However, the enthusiasm shown 
in getting the courts into condition 
when once the rain had stopped en- 
abled us soon to commence with 
the preparatory tournament. 

This year, as last, our boast is 
that every boy in Camp by the end 
of the summer could actually keep 
score himself and play tennis, and it 
is right here that I want to thank 
Mr. Comstock for the keen interest 
and enthusiasm he showed for 
everything that has to do with ten- 
nis at Pasquaney, and especially for 
the time and energy he gave to 
hours of instruction. 

Now we come to the final tour- 
naments. 

Starting with the youngest boys, 
the Sub-Juniors, they have shown 
very marked interest, improvement 
and skill. Of course to this class 
belong those who could not play at 
all before coming to Camp, and the 
earnestness with which they play 
before the season ended makes one 
feel that they have great futures be- 
cause of their perseverance, which 
is what counts in the long run. 
There were thirty entered in the 



Sub-Junior singles and Billy Win- 
stead and Charlie Stanwood reached 
the finals. It was a good match, 
and Charlie Stanwood, by his supe- 
rior control and better placing, won 
in straight sets; 6-3, 6-1. 

The Sub-Junior Doubles were 
played off on Tennis Finals Day 
and, as usual, afforded much amuse- 
ment to the spectators. This was 
an especially close match, and some 
wondered whether stage fright was 
a factor which influenced the out- 
come. Eddy Hawes and Charlie 
Stanwood deserve much credit for 
having defeated Billy Winstead and 
Clayton Banks ; 6-3, 4-6, 6-3. 

In the Junior Singles there were 
twenty-six entered and Dick Leon- 
ard and Ivy Lee reached the finals 
which were played off on the last 
Saturday. It would be rare to see 
a better match played by boys who 
had just left their twelfth year. 
They will both certainly have bril- 
liant futures as tennis players if 
they keep up their interest in the 
game. Ivy won a closer match than 
the score shows when he defeated 
Dick 6-2, 6-3. 

The Junior Doubles proved not 
in a class with the singles. How- 
ever, they were interesting and 
close. John Curtis and Caldwell 
Lindsay were defeated by Dick 
Leonard and Eddy Rakestraw 6-3, 
6-4. 

Next, we come to the Seniors. 
Last year's Camp champion did not 
return, so the winner of the Senior 



68 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 




Photograph by J. W. Spaeth, Jr. 

WINNLR5 OF THE. JUNIOR DOUBLES 

Singles was to be proclaimed Camp 
champion and receive the Herring 
cup. By his very steady back- 
court game "Junior" Phelps won 
from Mac Galbraith by the score 
6-0, 7-5, 6-2 and thereby attained 
the highest honor which we have to 
offer in tennis at Pasquaney. 

The Senior Doubles showed 
marked spots of brilliancy and kept 
ns all in a state of excitement hard 
to equal. Charlie Clarke and "Jun- 
ior" Phelps finally defeated Mac 



Galbraith and John Howland 6-3, 
6-4. 

in closing, I have only to thank 
all who had to do with making the 
tennis season such a success. 

D. D. Kennedy. 



BASEBALL 



When the Camp season of 1922 
opened, the conditions for baseball 
were not very favorable. It had 
rained steadily for the two preced- 
ing weeks, and it continued to rain 
for the following seven or eight 
days. The field was in reality a 
swamp, and ditches had to be dug 
across it to drain off the water. By 
the time the field had dried and the 
ditches had been filled in, three 
weeks had elapsed. 

Like all other athletic activities, 
baseball is part of the Camp rou- 
tine ; for all boys are expected to 
play at some time during their stay 
at Camp. This year, however, on 
account of the large number of boys 
and of other activities, it was diffi- 
cult to find a place for every one. 
Therefore the Junior teams were 
very large and every boy did not 
play as much as might be desired. 

The season of 1922 opened as 
usual, with the appointment of four 
captains for the Senior teams. 
These were "Pete" Lillard, team A; 
"Alex" Phelps, team B; "Bob" 
Gray, team C; "Charlie" Clarke, 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



69 



team D. Then came the usual prac- 
tice for the new boys, so that they 
might be classified as Seniors or 
Juniors. From the list of those se- 
lected as Seniors the captains picked 
their teams, which consisted of 
twelve boys and four counsellors. 
In games, however, the nine rep- 
resentatives of each team were 
seven boys and two counsellors. 

Teams A and B gained the right 
to play the deciding game by de- 
feating both Team C and Team D. 
In a very loosely played contest 
Team B, led by Phelps, won by a 
score of 9 to 1 from Team A, this 
making it two successive years that 
Phelps has captained the winning 
team. The members of the win- 
ning team were : Galbraith, p ; Mr. 
Crosman or Mr. Kennedy, c ; Mr. 
Bovaird, lb ; "Herb" Smith, 2b ; 
"Dave" Hinchman, 3b; "Alex" 
Phelps, s.s. ; Eliot Codman, l.f. ; 
"Eddie" Rakestraw, c.f. ; "Jack" 
Hinchman, r.f. ; Marshall, "Tommy" 
Hawes, Reed, and Beckwith, sub- 
stitutes. The final standing of the 
teams was : 

Won Lost Pet. 
B 3 1.000 

A 2 1 .667 

C 2 .000 

D 2 .000 

The week following the comple- 
tion of the Senior or Counsellors' 
league was marked by the depar- 
ture of the Long Walkers for Cho- 
corua and of camping parties for 
the younger boys. During this 



week the Junior teams were selec- 
ted, but as most of the members 
were either on the Walk or on 
camping parties, play could not be 
started until the following week. 
In this period, however, several 
"pick-up" games were played, and 
interest was kept up among the 
younger boys. 

The three Junior teams were 
"The Apes," "The Baboons," and 
"The Chimpanzees," captained by 
"Coggin" Lindsay, "Dan" Codman, 
and Scott Stewart respectively. In 
the games which followed, Lind- 
say's "Apes" defeated the other two 
teams and consequently won the 
Junior championship. 

The conclusion of the baseball 
season is marked customarily by 
the awarding of the Harvard Cup, 
which is given each year for "Gen- 
eral Excellence in Baseball at Pas- 
quaney." This requires that a boy 
shall not only have ability in base- 
ball and display spirit in his play- 
ing, but shall also show great in- 
terest and qualities of leadership. 
This year, however, there was a 
marked lack of one quality or an- 
other on the part of the older boys 
eligible for the cup, and such little 
interest was shown outside the reg- 
ular games that no award was 
made. Among the younger boys 
there was evinced some splendid 
spirit and interest, and the only rea- 
son that the cup was not awarded to 
one of them was the lack of ability 
in the game itself. For honorable 



?o 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 




Photograph by W. S. De La Cour 

CAPTAIN "PLTL"LILLARD AT THE BAT 

mention among the younger boys 
the name of Roderick Beebe, Jr., 
comes foremost. With the fine 
material present and good spirit 
shown in the Junior league we may 
hope for much better results in the 
near future. 

C. C. Townsend. 



SWIMMING 



quaney Lake disclosed the astound- 
ing fact that approximately twenty 



boys knew little or nothing about 
swimming. Accordingly, within 

two days a non-swimmers' club was 
founded and daily meetings were 
held in the calm water between the 
foundations of the old boat house. 
The first few lessons had but one 
aim in view, that of getting the boys 
accustomed to the water. With 
growing self-confidence came the 
added desire to splash and paddle 
around alone, in the hope that some 
degree of buoyancy could be at- 
tained. Before two weeks had 
passed three-fourths of the club 
had either crawled, floated, or dog- 
paddled from one foundation to the 
other, a distance of about fifteen 
feet. Success followed steadily 
upon success, until the entire class 
was permitted to join the rest of the 
Camp in the regular "soak ;" and 
some of the boys have achieved so 
much progress that they have been 
able to swim their triangles or even 
their half-miles. 

Speed swimming was not partic- 
ularly emphasized this year. In 
special cases some individual in- 
struction was given to boys who 
were entered in the swims on 
W T ater Sports Day or to half-milers ; 
but these cases were limited in 
number. 

The interest shown in half-mile 
swimming was very u n u s u a 1. 
Forty half-miles were swum during 
the summer, and of these a half- 
dozen were timed in less than six- 
teen minutes. "Bill" Sanford 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



7 1 



proved himself to be one of the best 
swimmers, if not the fastest swim- 
mer, that has ever attended Camp, 
by breaking the Camp half-mile rec- 
ord established by "Jim" McHenry 
in 1914. "Bill's" time was 13 min- 
utes, 14 2-5 seconds. The Parsons 
Half-Mile Cup that is awarded each 
year was won by "Randy" Lee, who 
covered the distance in 14 minutes, 



58 seconds. Sanford, having won 
the cup in a previous season (1920), 
was declared ineligible to receive it 
again this year. 

Five boys swam their miles dur- 
ing the season, the record swim be- 
ing made by "Joe" Vetterlein in 35 
minutes, 2 seconds. 

C. C. Buell. 



THE NATURALISTS REPORT 



The success of the past year has 
made itself felt at the Museum as 
well as elsewhere. The interest 
has been much more general, and 
more marked. There were forty- 
odd names entered on the list for 
morning bird-walks taken before 
Reveille. More boys than last year 
started collections, and more of 
them stuck to it. Specimens of all 
sorts were brought in and unique 
observations were reported. Some 
times it was that the mink had been 
seen again at the bath-house, that a 
skunk had been chased up a tree, 
or that a queer bug had split open 
and a dragon fly come out. Slight 
inaccuracies, such as mistaking a 
porcupine for a skunk in the indis- 
tinct moonlight, only added zest to 
the chase. "Randy" Lee, "Ned" 
Berwind, and Ward Tracy actually 
had such an experience, and made 



efforts to take a flash-light picture 
as the unknown animal came down. 
A very interesting picture would 
have undoubtedly resulted, had not 
part of the mechanism failed to op- 
erate. 

Exceedingly interesting observa- 
tions were made of ants, and of sev- 
eral kinds of bees. Basil Henning 
submitted an essay as well as field 
notes on ants, and won the Original 
Research Medal in that way. Paul 
Bird collected a number of interest- 
ing birds' nests, and also watched 
the construction and operation of 
two wasps' nests and a bumble-bees' 
nest. Eddie Hawes and Whitney 
Hoyt made collections, and were 
both successful in obtaining chrysa- 
lids by feeding captive caterpillars. 
"Eddie" Lihme collected all sum- 
mer, as well as finding a Veery's 
nest as it was hatching. Telford 



72 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Taylor made quite an exhaustive 
study of the fungi, edible and poi- 
sonous, growing around Camp. 
"Pat" Cator, "Dynah" Hufnagel, 

Felix Hughes, and Kelly An+hony 
made mineral collections; and the 
Medal for the Best Collection was 
given to Franklin Cator by reason 
not only of his persistent work, but 
also of his helpful interest in the 
other collections. 

The essays submitted for the 
Prize Essay Medal included a very 
interesting one by Ward Tracy on 
the flash-light photography of the 
porcupine episode, one by Taylor 



on the flight of birds, and one on 
Mosquitoes by Frank O. Reed. The 
medal was awarded to Charles Gow- 
ing for the essay on trees which is 
printed elsewhere in this issue. In 
it he suggests a novel and attractive 
explanation of the various types of 
seed peculiar to certain families. 
This essay appeared particularly 
fitting as an addition to the last Na- 
ture Talk of the season, since it ap- 
plies so convincingly to the familiar 
trees around Camp. 

Richard G. Sagebeer, 

Naturalist. 



THE PRIZE ESSAY 



THE 



WAR OF THE TREE 
CLANS 



Nature is fair and just, but never 
merciful. Those best fitted to sur- 
vive will survive; all others perish. 
The organisms which take advan- 
tage of their mistress and her moods 
live and send out their descendants 
to conquer the world. 

It is correct as well as fascinating 
to think of the different families or 
clans of trees as in a perpetual state 
of warfare with one another. Each 
clan is always thinking of some new 



way in which they may get an ad- 
vantage over their slower neigh- 
bors. All's fair in love or war 1 

The great problem of the tree 
clan is to distribute its progeny, the 
little seeds which bear the germ of 
life, over the wide face of the globe. 

All clans started with much the 
same sort of seed, a simple little 
globe without any attachment or 
surrounding whatsoever. Then the 
Maple family, noticing how violent 
were some of Nature's winds, 
equipped her little offspring with a 
pair of wings and they were able to 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



73 



sail for miles on the breast of the 
breeze. The Elms followed a dif- 
ferent school of aviation and sur- 
rounded their seeds with thin sail, 
just as you do when you wish to go 
ice-sailing. 

The Oak clan poked fun at the 
aviation systems of their rivals. 
Why not let the animals work for 
you, they said? So they enclosed 
their babies in a delicious, tasty nut, 
which the squirrel carried for long 
distances, often, before he dropped 
them. The Cherries thought of an 
improvement on that, so they 
claimed. They said the birds would 



carry their seeds, disguised luscious 
berries, much farther than the squir- 
rels could. But the Apple family 
thought of the best of all. They 
let man, who claimed to be the 
mightiest creature on earth, work 
for them ! 

And this is the way the tree clans 
fought, and how they took advan- 
tage of Old Mother Nature and her 
children. These few examples will 
show you how clever trees really 
are. It seems, when you think it 
over, as if they really had an intelli- 
gence of their own ! 

Charles D. Gowing. 




74 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 




THE SIGMA ALPHA FRATERNITY 
1922 



John Palmer Bankson, Jr. 
Marshall Moore Bartholomew 
Richard Case Berresford 
James Alexander Bovaird, Jr. 
Udolpho Theodore Bradley 
Charles Chauncey Buell 
Vinton Chapin 
Charles dishing Clarke 
Eliot Codman 
John Marshall Crosman 
Leonard Tomb Davidson 
Charles Darrow Gowing 
Robert Gray 

Thomas Eldridge Hawes 
James Williamson Henning, 3rd 
David Ballentine Hinchman 
Theodore Henry Hinchman, Jr. 
Edward William Cecil Jackson 



Donald Davidson Kennedy 
Richard Arthur Kimball 
Walter Huston Lillard, Jr. 
Huntington Miller 
Donald Murchie 
George Alexander Phelps, Jr. 
John Louis Rakestraw 
Frank Otheman Reed 
Richard Grafflin Sagebeer 
William Farnam Sanford 
Richard Barclay Scull 
William Stackhouse Scull, 2nd 
Herbert Simonds Smith 
John William Spaeth, Jr. 
John Cranwill Thompson 
Charles Cooper Townsend 
David Alexander Watt 
Edward Simpson Wilson 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



75 




THE WHITE PINE SOCIETY 
1922 



Clayton French Banks, Jr. 

Lloyd Bankson, 2nd 

Philip Van Dyke Beckwith 

Edward Julius Berwind, 2nd 

George Wales Brewster 

John Boylston Campbell 

Percy Chubb, 2nd 

John Allen Clarke 

Daniel Sargent Codman 

Samuel Eliot Codman 

John Norman Curtis 

Willis Scull De La Cour 

Robert Howard Eisenbrey, Jr. 

Thomas Hopkinson Eliot 

Joseph Fowler 

Frederic Mcintosh Galbraith 

Charles Chauncey Goodrich 

Robert Bigelow Gowing 

Francis Appleton Harding 

David Steele Hart 

Edmund Thatcher Hawes 

Basil Duke Henning 

John Marshal Hinchman, 2nd 

Henry Crane Hollister 

John Howland, Jr. 

Whitney Ford Hoyt 

Floyd Wellman Jefferson, Jr. 

Thomas Louis Jefferson 



Herbert Thorn King, Jr. 
Albert Randall Lee, Jr. 
Frederick Norton Leonard 
James Richard Leonard 
Ernest Douglas Levering, Jr. 
Ellwood Caldwell Lindsay, Jr. 
John Franciscus Lindsay 
Thomas McKean, Jr. 
Maurice Bursley Makepeace 
Edward LeBoutillier Marshall 
Thruston Ballard Morton 
Guy Murchie, Jr. 
Percy Owen, Jr. 
Nathaniel Pope, 2nd 
John Pierrepont Porter 
Edward Hyde Rakestraw 
Edwin Winter Ritchie 
Theodore Carmalt Scull 
Charles Fuller Stanwood 
Scott Stewart, Jr. 
Telford Taylor 
Laurence Edward Tracy 
William Ward Tracy 
Joseph Roy Vetterlein, Jr. 
James Bolton Winpenny, 2nd 
William Henry Winstead, Jr. 
Charles Francis Wood, Jr. 
John Gordon Harper Woodward 



7 6 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



THE LOG 
1922 



June 28 — After arrival and luncheon at 
Plymouth, the campers were 
warmly greeted by Mr. Ned 
near Dana Hall. Four can- 
non shots were given in honor 
of the 28th season, each repre- 
senting 7 years. Unpacking, 
dinner, and the first Retreat 
followed. 
29 — Due to rain, ping-pong was 
the order of the day. The 
winner of the new boys' tour- 
nament, Ivy Lee, defeated 
"Pete" Lillard, winner of the 
old hoys' tournament. At 

campfire Mr. Bartholomew led 
the singing and read a humor- 
ous French story. 
30 — First short spell of clear 
weather. Parties were sent 
out to Archie's and Sanborn's 
Beach. In the evening Mr. 
Buell read from Stevenson's 
"Suicide Club" before the 
weird, flickering flames of the 
campfire. 

July 1— Comprehensive nature talk and 
demonstration of new flash 
camera in Museum by Natural- 
ist Sagebeer. Barnard Estate 
"Wade" in the afternoon. 
After Retreat a smashing 
vaudeville program was pre- 
sented at the Playhouse, in- 
cluding the famous foreign 
tenor, Senior Watt-inski. 
2 — Dana won inspection. Mr. 
Ned gave powerful sermon on 
"Opportunity." Tree Talk by 
Mr. Bartholomew. At Camp 
Meeting E. Codman was elec- 



ted president; Phelps, vice- 
president; C. Clarke, secretary- 
treasurer; T. Hawes, Grand 
Bouncer. 

3 — Wet ground conditions pre- 
vented customary departure of 
camping parties. Try-outs for 
Water Sports Play. After 
dinner Mr. Ned and Mr. Ken- 
nedy conveyed a number of 
boys to Plymouth for haircuts 
and fireworks. 

4 — Cannon salute aroused the 
Camp for the glorious 4th! 
Selections for Water Sports 
Play cast announced. Mr. 
Ned and a large bunch of boys 
set off fireworks on the ball 
field. Dr. Davidson arrived. 

5 — Damp weather continued. New 
boys performed at ball field for 
benefit of "Charlie" Townsend 
and baseball captains. "Don" 
Kennedy took a happy supper 
party to Crescent Beach. 
"Miff" Frothingham, '98, ar- 
rived. 

6 — Baseball teams chosen. Vet- 
erlein swam half-mile, and 
Beckwith swam a mile in 38: 
29:2. Ward Tracy and "Ed- 
die" Hawes away with supper 
parties. Messrs. Chapin and 
Spaeth defeated Messrs. Kim- 
ball and Townsend in quoit 
match for Camp champion- 
ship (?) 

7 — The doctor was found respons- 
ible for yellow acid stains dis- 
covered on and about "Tom- 
my" Hawes. Mr. Bartholo- 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



11 



mew left Camp for a month. 
Big ping-pong finally com- 
pleted, Mr. Comstock winning 
the Senior and "Jack" Clarke 
the Junior events. Expedition 
to Archie's. 
8 — Walkers set off gaily in warm 
sunshine for Clement's Hill, 
accompanied by Mr. Ned. 
They returned still more gaily 
in drenching rain! "Dick" 
Leonard won Stay-at-Homes' 
ping-pong tournament. After 
Retreat a vaudeville show 
punctuated the first exhibition 
of the newly installed "movie" 
machine. A great success! 




9 — Birch won inspection for first 
time. In chapel Mr. Ned de- 
livered a stirring talk on "Un- 
selfishness." Mr. Spaeth gave 
a Tree Talk on "Habit," and 
followed it up in the evening 
at campfire by reading "A 
Message to Garcia." 
10 — The camping parties finally de- 
parted. The Stay-at-Homes 
started tennis and quoit tour- 
naments. "Teddy" Church left 
Camp temporarily with his 
parents. 
11 — "Boots" Marshall arrived, his 
chicken pox cured. 'First re- 
hearsal of stupendous Stay-at- 
Home Play was held. Crews 
practiced in the afternoon. 



12 — A quiet day, due to extreme 
heat. Mr. Ned visited the 
camping parties, and Mr. 
Jackson joined his party at 
Mayhew's. At campfire Mr. 
Crosman read from A. Conan 
Doyle's "His Last Bow." 
13 — A day of matches at Camp, 
most of the tennis and quoit 
tournaments being played off. 
In the afternoon Mr. Ned es- 
corted a party to Bristol. 
14 — The campers returned at soak, 
lumpy but happy. A natural 
history expedition went up the 
Cockermouth. A supper party 
also visited the Cockermouth. 
15 — After the inspection, which 
was won by Cardigan, two 
walks started, one to "Mt. 
Kennedy" (a spur of Crosby) 
and one, for younger boys, to 
Plymouth Mountain. Mr. 

Kimball staged the astounding 
Stay-at-Home spectacle, "The 
Island Tragedy"; there were 
also four reels of good moving 
pictures. 
16 — Mr. Ned preached in chapel 
on "Honesty." Dana won in- 
spection. Mr. Chapin gave a 
Tree Talk on "Good Sports- 
manship." "Pete" Lillard was 
made a C. of I., and "Don" 
Murchie and "Dave" Hinch- 
man were given Canoe Privi- 
lege. After supper Prof. Fred 
Jackson gave us a splendid 
talk on the Solar System. 
17 — The second week camping par- 
ties and "Miff" Frothingham 
left Camp. At home some ob- 
stacle races were run off, pre- 
liminary to the Water Sports. 
A thunder storm broke tow- 
ards evening. 
18 — Dr. Davidson, because of rain, 
brought several members of the 



78 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



camping parties back to Camp, 
where quoit, ping-pong and 
tennis matches were in full 
swing. Mr. Thompson read 
an uproarious "Siwash" story 
at campfire. 

19 — Preliminaries for the Water 
Sports, as well as the usual 
quoit and tennis matches, were 
in vogue. Try-outs for the 
Stay-at-Homes' play were 
held. 

20 — A quiet day, in spite of the 
afternoon's ball game. More 
Water Sports preliminaries 
were run off. 

21 — The return of the campers was 
a sign for much activity in 
Stay-at-Home tournaments. 
After rest period and allow- 
ances a party ventured to Ar- 
chie's. There were singing and 
reading at campfire. 







22 — The day's walk was to Wel- 
ton's Falls, where cool dips 
were enjoyed by Mr. Ned and 
the party. After the return to 
Camp a rip-roaring Stay-at- 
Home show made the walker^ 
forget all their "pains and ills." 

23 — Inspection was won by Sleep- 
ing Porch. At chapel service, 
held in Memorial Hall, Mr. 
Jackson delivered a fine ser- 
mon on "Pasquaney Boys." 
The Tree Talk by Mr. Cros- 



man was given on "Prepara- 
tion." Camp Meeting was 
held in the evening. 

24 — Water Sports preliminaries got 
under way in real earnest. 
Owen Lindsay, '21, and 
"Dusky" Brownell, '21, ar- 
rived for a week's stay. An- 
other "Siwash" story at camp- 
fire. 

25 — Preparations for the Sports 
were nearing completion. Mr. 
Ned and Mr. Kennedy mo- 
tored to Plymouth in the after- 
noon. Play cast was undergo- 
ing intensive rehearsing. 

26 — Diving and some of the swims, 
the last remaining preliminaries 
w^ere run off. More reading 
and singing at campfire. 

27 — Intensive resting and the an- 
nual trunk and suit-case in- 
spections took up most of the 
day. There were play re- 
hearsals throughout the day. 
Last round of practice singing 
at campfire. 

28 — Mr. Ned was forced by a bad 
cold to remain in bed. Very 
thorough policing and chain- 
gang work eliminated the usual 
trip to Archie's. After Re- 
treat the dress rehearsal of the 
Water Sports Plays, "An Af- 
flicted Man" and "A Morality 
Play for the Leisure Class," 
was given in the Playhouse for 
the benefit of the Camp and 
some neighbors. 

29 — A perfect day for Water 
Sports! In the afternoon's 
contests Ward Tracy won Gen- 
eral Excellence and "Eddie" 
Rakestraw Sub-Junior General 
Excellence. Messrs. Brownell, 
Scull, and Reed were judges. 
After refreshments in Me- 
morial Hall, our many visitors 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



79 



attended Retreat and the 
Water Sports Plays, and were 
later entertained by the sing- 
ing, the huge campfire, and the 
presentation of cups and 
medals. 

30 — Fifty guests were on hand to 
enjoy Mr. Ned's sermon on 
"Energy and Perseverance," 
and many remained for dinner. 
Clearpool Camp offering in 
chapel amounted to $330. 
Messrs. T. C. Fowler and G. 
H. Townsend remained for a 
visit of several days. 

31 — The "Week of Rest" began. 
After soak Mr. Kennedy gave 
instruction in tennis; and dur- 
ing the afternoon Team A de- 
feated D, in the first game of 
the Counsellors Baseball 
League. "Jack" Bankson ar- 
rived. "Pick" Low, '09, and 
"Del" Ladd, '14, visited us. 
Aug. 1 — Mr. W. S. Scull gave canoe 
tests after soak. In the after- 
noon Team B won from C, 
5-1. Dr. John Howland vis- 
ited Camp. 
2 — After another exciting baseball 
game, in which Team B wors- 
ted D, 6-2, the White Pine 
Society gave its annual sup- 
per to the whole Camp at the 
clubhouse. Mr. Sagebeer read 
"Zenk" at campfire. 




Aucj-tjs r- 5. 



3 — In the morning, after the 
Camp photographs had been 
taken, "Bill" Sanford broke 
the half-mile record: time, 
13:14 2-5. Team A defeated 
C in the afternoon, 11-4. Prof. 
Fred Jackson lectured after 
supper on "The Moon." 

4 — Baseball Team B, captained by 
"Alex" Phelps, won the Camp 
championship by defeating A, 
9-1. "Eddie" Wardwell, '17, 
paid us a visit. 

5 — After rest period "Don" Ken- 
nedy led the Long Walk party 
on a short but snappy walk. 
"Bob" Leonard, '21, and 
"Jerry" Sherman, '17, visited 
Camp. Mr. Kimball's cast 
presented the Play take-off, 
"A Conflicting Man," after Re- 
treat; there were also several 
reels of good moving pictures. 

6 — Mr. Ned's sermon dealt with 
"Courage." Mr. Sagebeer de- 
livered a Tree Talk in Baird 
Hall on "Nature and Life." A 
Camp Meeting closed the day's 
program. 

7 — The Long Walkers departed, 
amid rain, for their hike to Mt. 
Chocorua. The Stay-at- 

Homes were limited to indoor 
games. "Billy" Guild, '05, ar- 
rived, and Owen Lindsay, '21, 
left. 

8 — Thorn King left Camp early 
by motor to join the Long 
Walkers. After rest period 
some played touch football, 
while a few paddled to San- 
born's Beach with "Udo" 
Bradley. Myles Baker, coun- 
sellor in '20, arrived for an 
overnight stay. 

9 — Before soak "Lanty" Sims, 
Myles Baker, and three young 
camping parties left Camp. 



8o 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



The Cardigan hikers, with 
"Jack" Bankscm and "Doc" 
Davidson in charge, departed 
soon after lunch. The after- 
noon was quiet. Percy Owen 
entertained us with a wireless 
concert in the evening, his 
"Radio" connecting Pittsburgh, 
Pa. 

10 — A quiet day. The Cardigan 
walkers returned in the after- 
noon. "Fritz" Ganiage, '12, 
was a visitor. Play rehearsal 
for the Stay-at-Home Play 
was held. 

11 — Camping parties returned be- 
fore dinner. Tournament ten- 
nis matches were played. 
"Spud" Murphy, '21, arrived 
in Camp after supper. Mr. 
Guild read an animal story at 
campfire. 

12 — This was a "half-mile morn- 
ing." Mr. Guild gave a talk 
on "Radio" during rest period. 
The Long Walkers returned at 
supper time, fit and happy, and 
received a tremendous ovation. 
There was a scintillating show 
afterwards, including five reels 
of moving pictures. 

13 — "Friendship" was the subject 
of Mr. Ned's fine sermon in 
chapel. Due to a long coun- 
cil meeting, the Tree Talk was 
given after supper: Mr. Kim- 
ball spoke on "Self-Reliance. " 
A Camp Meeting followed. 

14 — In the morning a fishing trip 
to the Cockermouth, under Mr. 
Guild, caught naught but 
crabs! General Verbeck, of 
St. John's School, Manlius, in- 
spected the Camp and spoke at 
dinner. After Retreat Prof. 
Fred Jackson talked most in- 
terestingly on "The Stars." 
"Tready" White, '21, and 




AuG-asr— Z4-. 



"Dick" Zanetti, '21, arrived for 
a week's visit; T. D. Leonard, 
'14, was here for a brief stay. 

15 — Before soak "Chick" Guild left 
Camp, to our regret. Messrs. 
Bankson and W. S. Scull dem- 
onstrated life-saving at the 
water. After rest period Jun- 
ior baseball team C was beaten 
by A, 13-5. 

16 — Mr. Ned took several counsel- 
lors and boys to Bristol. Dr. 
L. C. Sanford was a guest at 
dinner. The day was generally 
quiet. 

17 — First Senior crew time trials 
were held after soak. "Dick" 
Donham, '19. and "Phil" Don- 
ham, '20, came at lunch for a 
short visit. Junior baseball 

Team A ("Apes' ), with "Cog- 
gin" Lindsay as captain, de- 
feated B, 5-2, thereby winning 
the Junior championship. "Pa" 
Lillard, '07. made a short visit 
after Taps. 

18 — At soak we were visited again 
by "Tick" Hewitt, counsellor, 
'07. After rest period and al- 
lowances, Mr. Hinchman es- 
corted a party to Archie's. 
The Counsellors defeated fhe 
Boys, 15-5. in a weird game of 
baseball. 

19 — "Charlie" Farnsworth. '07. was 
an early visitor. Senior crews 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



81 



underwent time trials again. 
"Charlie" Townsend pitched 
for East Hebron and won. Dr. 
"Leddy" Leadbetter, counsel- 
lor 1914-20, arrived before sup- 
per, in time to witness the in- 
ter-dormitory dramatic con- 
test, which was won by Dana's 
"Three Brass Bedouins"; five 
reels of good motion pictures 
were an added attraction. 

20 — Inspection was won by Car- 
digan. Mr. Jackson talked 
splendidly in chapel on "Equa- 
nimity." Mr. Thompson de- 
livered a fine Tree Talk on 
"Nine Weeks at Pasquaney 
vs. Ten Months at Home." 
At supper "Pete" Lillard and 
"Ed" Berwind were given 
Canoe Privilege. There was 
no campfire. 

21 — "Leddy" Leadbetter, "Dick" 
Zanetti, and "Tready" White 
ended their visits, and "Dave" 
Grant, '21, and Henry deRham, 
'17, arrived. "Bob" Eisenbrey 
left Camp for the season. 
Crews practised late in the 
afternoon. At campfire Mr. 
Thompson read "His Soul 
Goes Marching On." 

22 — There were more crew time 
trials, and at dinner the make- 
up of the Junior crews was 
announced. Tournament tennis 
matches were in vogue. There 
were charades at campfire to 
entertain the limited number 
that attended. 

23 — The open quoit singles and 
Senior Tennis Singles tourna- 
ments were brought up to the 
final round. Crews had their 
last practice. Mr. Diefendorf 
read Sherlock Holmes at 
campfire, the last to be held 



outside. "Steve" Davol left 
Camp for the season. 

24 — Weather was threatening, but 
in the afternoon "Aleck" 
Phelps became Camp Singles 
Champion in Tennis by defeat- 
ing "Mac" Galbraith, 6-0, 7-5, 
6-2. Mr. Spaeth read Poe's 
"The Black Cat" to a sleepy 
crowd at campfire. 

25 — A very wet day. In late after- 
noon the Crew Races were 
held: Birch Juniors led Dana 
Juniors by a length and a 
quarter, but the Birch and 
Dana Seniors crossed the fin- 
ish line in a dead heat after a 
beautiful race. At campfire in 
Baird Hall Mr. Bartholomew 
spoke very impressively about 
the purchase of the adjacent 
Soren Estate (103 acres). 
Harold Payson, '02, and his 
son visited. "Rod" Beebe, '05, 
arrived. 



Af^c/sr — ZS". 




26 — Tennis Finals. In the morn- 
ing "Dick" Leonard and "Ed- 
die" Rakestraw won the Jun- 
ior Tennis Doubles by defeat- 
ing "Coggin" Lindsay and 
"Johnny" Curtis, and "Charlie" 
Stanwood won the Sub-Junior 
Singles from "Billy" Winstead. 
In the afternoon Ivy Lee de- 
feated "Dick" Leonard in the 



82 



THE PASOUAXEV ANNUAL 



Junior Singles; "Charlie" 
Clarke and "Aleck" Phelps 
won the Senior Doubles from 
John Howland and "Mac" 
Galbraith; "Charlie" Stan- 
wood and "Eddie" Hawes de- 
feated "Billy" Winstead and 
Clayton Banks in the Sub- 
Junior Doubles. At the Sigma 
Alpha Tea in the evening the 
cups were presented by Miss 
Phelps. 
27 — The last inspection was won 
by Sleeping Porch. Mr. Ned 
preached a strong sermon on 
"Purity." The subject of 
Chauncey Buell's fine Tree 
Talk was "Appreciation." 
Statistics were voted at camp- 
fire in Baird Hall in the eve- 
ning. Last long Council meet- 
ing filled afternoon and eve- 
ning. 



28 — Most of the day was rainy. 
Several boys left Camp. Pack- 
ing was in vogue. At supper 
Mr. Ned announced Eliot Cod- 
man as the Council's choice 
for Most Faithful Boy and 
"Pete" Lillard for Ray Biglow 
Cup. Counsellors spoke their 
farewells. There was the best 
singing of the year at the last 
campfire in Baird Hall. 

29 — Trunks were shipped after 
breakfast. The Boston party 
left Camp at 11 o'clock, and 
the New York party at 4:30. 
Lusty cheers for Mr. Ned, Mr. 
Jackson, and Pasquaney 
marked the end of one of the 
Camp's best seasons. 

Charles D. Gowing, 
John W. Spaeth, Jr. 




THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



83 



BOYS' RECORDS 



Anthony, Earle K. ; age 10. Hills- 
borough School, '24. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

Banks, Clayton F. ; age 12. Haver- 
ford School, '28. Pasquaney, 
'22. 

Bankson, Lloyd, 2nd ; age 12. Hav- 
erford School, '27. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22. Winning Junior Base- 
ball Team, '22. 

Beckwith, Philip Van D. ; age 14. 
Kent School, '26. Pasquaney, 
'18, '19, '20, '21, '22. Winner 
of Canoe Tilt, '21. Long Walk, 
'21, '22. Winning Junior Base- 
ball Team, '20, '21 ; Winning 
Senior Baseball Team, '22. An- 
nual Board, '22. 

Beebe, Roderick, Jr.; age 11. Ag- 
assiz School, Cambridge, '24. 
Pasquaney, '22. Winning Jun- 
ior Baseball Team, '22. 

Berresford, Richard C. ; age 15. 
Horace Mann School, '24. 
Pasquaney, '19, '20, '21, '22. 
Sub-Junior Obstacle Race, '19; 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '19; 
Sub-Junior General Excellence, 
'19. Second in Junior 50- Yards 
Swim, '22. Winning Senior 
Baseball Team, '20; Cox., Dana 
Junior Crew, '19; Cox., Junior 
Exhibition Crew, '20; Cox., 
Birch Junior Crew, '20; Cox., 
Exhibition Crew, '21 ; Cox. and 
Captain, Dana Senior Crew, 
'21 ; Cox. and Captain, Dana 



Exhibition Crew, '22 ; Cox. and 
Captain, Dana Senior Crew, '22. 
Winner Junior Tennis Doubles, 
'21. Yale Cup, '22. Annual 
Board, '22. 

Berwind, Edward J., 2nd ; age 14. 
St. Paul's School, '26. Pasqua- 
ney, '19, '20, '21, '22. Winner, 
Junior Canoe Race, '22. Best 
Collection Medal, '19. Canoe 
Privilege, '22. 

Bird, John P. ; age 13. Noble and 
Greenough School, '27. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

Bonney, Arthur P. ; age 10. Long- 
wood Day School, '27. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

Brewster, George W. ; age 14. 
Country Day School, '25. Pas- 
quaney, '22. Water Sports 
Play Cast, '22. Dana Junior 
Crew, '22. 

Buell, Robert C. ; age 11. Noah 
Webster Public School, Hart- 
ford, '28. Pasquaney, '22. 

Campbell, J. Boylston ; age 16. 
Sanford School, '23. Pasqua- 
ney, '18, '19, '20, '21, '22. Long 
Walk, '22. 

Cator, Franklin P. ; age 11. Gil- 
man Country School, '28. Pas- 
quaney, '22. Natural History 
Prize Collection, '22. 

Chubb, Percy, 2nd; age 13. St. 
Paul's School, '27. Pasquaney, 
'20, '21, '22. Sub-Junior Tennis 



8 4 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Doubles, '20. Winning Junior 
Baseball Team, '22. 

Church, Fdgar Moore, Jr.; age 12. 
William Penn Charter School, 
'28. Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22. 
Winner, Sub-Junior Dingey 
Race, '21. Winning Junior 
Baseball Team, '22. 

Clarke, Charles C. ; age 16. Brown 
and Nichols, '24. Pasquaney, 
'18, '19, '20, '21, '22. Second 
in Junior Canoe Race, '19; Win- 
ning Senior Canoe, '22; Win- 
ner W T itherbee Black Obstacle 
Race, '22. Stage Hand, '22. 
Winning Senior Baseball 
Team, '19, '21 ; Captain Senior 
Baseball Team D, '22. Long 
Walk, '19, '20, '21, '22. Cox., 
Birch Senior Crew, '19; Birch 
Junior Crew r , '20 ; Winning 
Dana Junior Crew r , '21 ; Dana 
Exhibition Crew, '22; Dana 
Senior Crew, '22. Winner, 
Senior Tennis Doubles, '22. 
Librarian, '21, '22. Mail Com- 
mittee, '22. Canoe Privilege, 
'21. Secretary-Treasurer, Camp 
Society, '22. Captain of Indus- 
try, '22. 

Clarke, John A.; age 12. Wadleigh 
School, Winchester, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '21, '22. W r inner, Sub- 
Junior 25- Yards Swim, '21 ; Sub- 
Junior General Excellence, '21; 
Third in Junior 50- Yards Swim, 
'22. Cox., Winning Birch Jun- 
ior Crew, '22. 

Codman, Daniel S. ; age 16. St. 
Mark's, '26. Pasquaney, '20, 
'21, '22. Play Cast, '20. Win- 



ner, Junior Canoe Race, '22. 
Captain of Junior Baseb2.ll 
Team, '22. 

Codman, Eliot; age 18. St. Mark's, 
'23. Pasquaney, '18, 20, '21, 
'22. Winning Senior Basebail 
Team, '20, "21, '22. Long 
Walk, '20, "21, "22. Birch Ex- 
hibition Crew, '22; Birch Sen- 
ior Crew, '22. President, Camp 
Society, '22. Captain of Indus- 
try, '21, '22. Most Faithful 
Boy, '22. 

Codman, Samuel E. ; age 14. St. 
Mark's, '27. Pasquaney, '20, 
'21, '22. Winner, Sub-Junior 
25-Yards Swim, '20 ; Second in 
Sub-Junior Obstacle Race, '20 ; 
Sub-Junior General Excellence, 
'20. 

Curtis, John N. ; age 13. William 
Penn Charter School, '27. Pas- 
quaney, '22. Long W^alk, '22. 

Davol, Stephen ; age 15. The Long- 
wood Day School, '26. Pas- 
quaney, '22. Long Walk, '22. 

Day, Frederick T. ; age 10. Pel- 
ham Manor Day School, '29. 
Pasquaney, '22. 

De La Cour, Willis S. ; age 14. Wil- 
liam Penn Charter School, '26. 
Pasquaney, '19, '20, '21, '22. 
Winning junior Baseball 
Team, '20, '21. 

de Rham, Richard D. ; age 11. Law- 
rence Smith School, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

Eiscnbrey, Robert H., Jr.; age 15. 
St. George's School, '25. Pas- 
quaney, '20, '21, '22. Winning 
Junior Canoe, '21. Stage Hand, 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



85 



'21. Winning Junior Baseball 
Team, '21. 

Eliot, Thomas H. ; age 15. Browne 
and Nichols, '23. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22. Winning Senior 

Canoe, '21. Long Walk, '22. 
Birch Junior Crew, '21 ; Stroke 
and Captain, Birch Exhibition 
Crew and Birch Senior Crew, 
'22. 

Fowler, Joseph ; age 12. Bronx- 
ville Public School, '26. Pas- 
quaney, '20, '21, '22. Winner, 
Sub-Junior Tennis Doubles, '21. 

Galbraith, Frederic Mel. ; age 15. 
Williston Seminary, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '22. Winning Senior 
Canoe, '22. Winning Senior 
Baseball Team, '22. Long 
Walk, '22. 

Goodrich, Charles C. ; age 15. Pom- 
fret, '24. Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22. Cox., Winning Dana Jun- 
ior Crew, '21. 

Gowing, Charles D. ; age 17. Coun- 
try Day School, '24. Pasqua- 
ney, '19, '20, '21, '22. Water 
Sports Play Cast, '22. Long 
Walk, '20, '22. Birch Exhibi- 
tion Crew and Birch Senior 
Crew, '22. Natural History 
Prize Essay, '22. Captain of 
Industry, '22. Annual Board, '21, 
'22. 

Gowing, Robert B.; age 14. Coun- 
try Day School, '25. Pasqua- 
ney, '19, '20, '21, '22. Water 
Sports Play Cast, '22. Win- 
ning Senior Baseball Team, '20. 

Grant, George H. ; age 12. Kalffus 



School, Rochester, '25. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

Gray, Robert ; age 14. Gardiner 
High School, '26. Pasquaney, 
'20, '21, '22. Winning Senior 
Baseball Team, '21 ; Captain of 
Senior Baseball Team C, '22. 
Long Walk, '20, '21, '22. Win- 
ner Junior Tennis Singles, '20 ; 
Winner Junior Tennis Doubles, 
'20. 

Harding, Francis A. ; age 14. St. 
Mark's, '26. Pasquaney, '22. 
Long Walk, '22. Stroke, Jun- 
ior Dana Crew, '22. 

Harding, John B.; age 10. Fay 
School, '24. Pasquaney, '22. 

Hart, David S. ; age 11. McTer- 
nean's School, Waterbury, '27. 
Pasquaney, '22. Winning Jun- 
ior Baseball Team, '22. 

Hawes, Edmund T. ; age 11. Rog- 
ers Grammar School, '24. Pas- 
quaney, '21, '22. Second in 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '21 ; 
Winner, '22. Water Sports 
Play Cast, '21. Cox., Dana 
Junior Crew, '22. Winner, 
Sub-Junior Tennis Doubles, '22. 

Hawes, Thomas E. ; age 17. Tabor 
Academy, '24. Pasquaney, 

'17, '18, '19, '20, '21, '22. Win- 
ning Senior Canoe, '22. Water 
Sports Play Cast, '21, '22. Win- 
ning Senior Baseball Team, '22. 
Long Walk, '19, '20, '22. Cox., 
Winning Birch Junior Crew, 
T8; Winning Dana Junior 
Crew, '20 ; Dana Senior Crew, 
'21 ; Dana Exhibition Crew and 



86 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Dana Senior Crew, '22 Bugler, 
'17. '18, '19, '20, '21, '22. "Grand 
Bouncer," Camp Society, '22. 
Canoe Privilege, '20. Captain 
of Industry, '21, '22. 

Hennirig, Basil D. ; age 12. Coch- 
ran School, Louisville, '23. 
Pasquaney, '21, '22. Natural 
History Prize Collection, '21 ; 
Research Medal, '22. 

Henning, James W., 3rd; age 15. 
Louisville Male High School, 
'24. Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22. 
Water Sports Play Cast, '22. 
Captain Junior Baseball Team 
C, '21. Cox., Winning Birch 
Senior Crew, '21 ; Cox., Birch 
Exhibition Crew and Birch 
Senior Crew, '22. Annual 

Board, '21, '22. 

Hinchman, David B. ; age 15. Phil- 
lips Exeter Academy, '24. Pas- 
quaney, '19, '20, '21, '22. Win- 
ning Senior Baseball Team, '22. 
Long Walk, '20, '21, '22. Birch 
Junior Crew, '22. Canoe Priv- 
ilege, '22. Captain of Industry, 
'22. 

Hinchman, John M., 2nd; age 14. 
Phillips Exeter Academy, '25. 
Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22. Third 
in Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, 
'20. Winning Senior Baseball 
Team, '20, '22. Long Walk, 
'22. Winning Junior Tennis 
Singles. '21. 

Hollister, Buell ; age 10. Corning 
Public School, '25. Pasquaney, 
'22. 

Hollister, Henry C. ; age 14. St. 
John's School, Manlius, N. Y., 



'26. Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22. 

Howland, John, Jr.; age 16. Phil- 
lips Exeter Academy, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '20, '21, '22. Water 
Sports Play Cast, '20. Long 
Walk, '21, '22. Winning Birch 
Junior Crew, '22. 

Hoyt, Whitney F. ; age 12. Roch- 
ester Public School 31, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

Hufnagel, Frederick B. ; age 11. 
Miss Munson's Prep. School, '27. 
Pasquaney, '22. 

Hughes, Felix T., Jr. ; age 10. Public 
School No. 23, New York, '23. 
Pasquaney, '22. Winning Junior 
Baseball Team, '22. 

Jefferson, Floyd W., Jr.; age 11. 
Short Hills High School, '25. 
Pasquaney, '22. 

Jefferson, T. Louis; age 12. State 
Street School, Springfield, '25. 
Pasquaney, '21, '22. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '21. Win- 
ner, Sub-Junior Tennis Singles, 
'21 ; Sub-Junior Tennis Doubles, 
'21. 

King, H. Thorn, Jr. ; age 15. Private 
Tutor. Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22. 
Long Walk, '21, '22. Winning 
Birch Junior Crew, '22. 

Lee, A. Randell, Jr.; age 15. Law- 
renceville, '26. Pasquaney, '19, 
'20, '21, '22. Junior Canoe Race, 
'20; Winner. Canoe Tilt. '22. 
Long Walk, '20, '21. Birch 
Junior Crew, '21 ; Birch Exhibi- 
tion Crew and Birch Senior 
Crew, '22. Parsons Cup for 
Half-mile Swim, '22. Annual 
Board, '21, '22. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



87 



Lee, Ivy L., Jr. ; age 13. Barnard 
School, '27. Pasquaney, '22. 
Winner, Junior Tennis Singles, 
'22. 

Leonard, Fredrick N. ; age 12. Pecks 
School, '26. Pasquaney, '21, '22. 

Leonard, J. Richard ; age 12. The 
Red House, Groton, '23. Pas- 
quaney, '19, '20, '21, '22. Second 
in Sub-Junior 25-Yard Swim, 
'20; Third in Sub-Junior 25- 
Yards Swim, '21. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '20; 
Winning Senior Baseball Team, 
'21. Winner, Junior Tennis 
Doubles, '22. 

Levering, Ernest D. ; age 12. Gilman 
Country School, '28. Pasquaney, 
'22. 

Lihme, Edward H. ; age 12. The 
Webster School, Chicago, '23. 
Pasquaney, '21, '22. 

Lillard, Walter H., Jr. ; age 14. Ta- 
bor Academy, '26. Pasquaney, 
'20, '21, '22. Third in Junior 50- 
Yards Swim, '20. Captain, 
Senior Baseball Team A, '21, 
'22. Long Walk, '22. Junior Ten- 
nis Doubles, '20. Canoe Privi- 
lege, '22. Captain of Industry, 
'22. Ray Biglow Cup, '22. 

Lindsay, E. Caldwell, Jr. ; age 14. 
Haverford School, '24. Pas- 
quaney, '19, '20, '21, '22. Cap- 
tain, Winning Junior Baseball 
Team, '22. 

Lindsay, John F. ; age 12. Haverford 
School, '27. Pasquaney, '21, '22. 
Winner Sub-Junior Dingey 
Race, '22. Winning Junior Base- 
ball Team, '22. 



Lloyd, Carrington M. ; age 12. 
Country Day School, '29. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

McKean, Thomas, Jr. ; age 13. St. 
Paul's School, '27. Pasquaney, 
'22. 

Makepeace, Maurice B. ; age 15. Ta- 
bor Academy, '24. Pasquaney, 
'22. Long Walk, '22. 

Marshall, Edward Le B.; age 13. 
Radnor High School, '27. Pas- 
quaney, '19, '20, '21, '22. Win- 
ning Senior Baseball Team, '22. 

Miller, Huntington; aged 15. Pom- 
fret School, '24. Pasquaney, 
'19, '20, '21, '22. Winning Jun- 
ior Canoe, '21. Stage Hand, '21. 
Water Sports Play Cast, '22. 

Morton, Thruston B. ; age 15. Wood- 
berry Forest School, '25. Pas- 
quaney, '20, '21, '22. Long 
Walk, '22. 

Munson, Townsend ; age 10. Mont- 
gomery School, '25. Pasquaney, 
'22. Annual Board, '22. 

Murchie, Donald ; age 16. Phillips 
Exeter Academy, '23. Pasqua- 
ney, '20, '21, '22. Second in Jun- 
ior 50- Yards Swim, '20; Second 
in Senior 100- Yards Swim, '22; 
Winning Senior Canoe, '22. 
Stage Hand, '21. Water Sports 
Play Cast, '22. Long Walk, '21, 
'22. Captain Dana Junior Crew, 
'22. Prize Essay, '21. Canoe 
Privilege, '22. Captain of In- 
dustry, '22. Thomas Hike Cup, 
'22. Annual Board, '22. 

Murchie, Guy, Jr.; age 15. Kent 
School, '25. Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22. Long Walk, '21, '22. Win- 



b8 



THE PASOUAXEY ANNUAL 



ning Junior Baseball Team, '21, 
'22. Winning Birch Junior 
Crew, '22. Natural History 
Prize Essay, '20. Original Re- 
search Medal, '21. 

Owen, Percy, Jr.; age 14. Hoteh- 
kiss, '24. Pasquaney, '20, '21, 
'22. Third in Diving, '20; Sec- 
ond in Diving, '21, '22; First in 
Junior 50- Yard Swim, '21. 

Phelps, George A., Jr. ; age 16. 
Hotchkiss, '24. Pasquaney, '19, 
'20, '21, '22. -Captain, Winning- 
Senior Baseball Team, '21, '22. 
Long Walk, '20. Captain and 
Stroke, Winning Birch Junior 
Crew, '22. Winner, Senior 
Tennis Doubles, '21, '22; Win- 
ner Senior Tennis Singles, '22; 
Camp Tennis Singles Cham- 
pion, '22. Mail Committee, '22. 
Vice-President, Camp Society, 
'22. Captain of Industry, '22. 
Harvard Cup, '21. Ray Biglow 
Cup, '21. 

Pope, Nathaniel, 2d.; age 13. Fair- 
haven High School, '26. Pas- 
quaney, '21, '22. Winning Jun- 
ior Baseball Team, '22. 

Porter, John P.; age 14. Foreign 
Travel. Pasquaney, '22. 

Rakestraw, Edward H. ; age 13. Ha- 
verford School, '26. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22. Second in Sub-Junior 
25-Yards Swim, '22; Winner, 
Sub-Junior Obstacle Race, '22; 
Sub-Junior General Excellence, 
'22. Winning Senior Baseball 
Team, '22. Winner, Junior 
Tennis Doubles, '22. 

Rakestraw, John L. ; age 17. Ha- 



verford School, '24. Pasquaney, 
'19, '20, '21, '22. Stage Hand, 
'21 ; Water Sports Play Stage 
Manager, '22. Winning Junior 
Baseball Team, '21. 

Reed, Frank O. ; age 16. Auburn 
Academic High School, '23. 
Pasquaney, '20, '21, '22. Stage 
Hand, '21. Water Sports Play 
Electrician, '22. Winning Senior 
Baseball Team, '22. Captain of 
Industry, '22. Annual Board, 
'21, '22/ 

Ritchie, Edwin W. ; age 14. St. 
Paul Academy, '25. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22. Third in Diving, '21, 
'22. Long Walk, '21, '22. 

Sanford, Leonard J. ; age 12. Rum- 
say Hall, '25. Pasquaney, '21, 
'22. Winning Junior Baseball 
Team, '21, '22. 

Sanford, William F. ; age 17. St. 
Paul's School, '23. Pasquaney, 
'19, '20, '21, '22. Second in Jun- 
ior 50- Yards Swim, '19; First 
in Senior 100- Yards Swim, '20, 
'22. Water Sports Play Cast, 
'21. Winning Senior Baseball 
Team, '19, '21. Long Walk, '20, 
'22. Senior Exhibition Crew, 
'20, '21 ; Winning Dana Senior 
Crew, '20; Dana Senior Crew. 
'21 ; Dana Exhibition Crew and 
Dana Senior Crew, '22. Winner, 
Senior Tennis Doubles, '21. 
Parsons Cup for Half-Mile Rec- 
ord Swim, '20; Camp Half-Mile 
Record, '22. Canoe Privilege, 
'20, '21, '22. Captain of Indus- 
try, '22. Annual Board, '22. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



89 



Scull, Theodore C. ; age 12. Mont- 
gomery School, '29. Pasquaney, 
'21, '22. 

Smith, Herbert S. ; age 16. Country 
Day School, '24. Pasquaney, 
'20, '21, '22. Stage Hand, '22. 
Winning Senior Baseball Team, 
'22. Long Walk, '21. Captain 
of Industry, '22. 

Stanwood, Charles F. ; age 12. 
Brunswick, Me., Public School. 
Pasquaney, '21, '22. Winning 
Junior Baseball Team, '21, '22. 
Winner, Sub-Junior Tennis 
Singles, and Sub-Junior Tennis 
Doubles, '22. 

Stewart, Scott, Jr. ; age 14. St. Paul's 
School, '26. Pasquaney, '19, 
'20, '21, '22. Winner of Sub- 
Junior Dingey Race, '19. Cap- 
tain of Junior Baseball Team, 
'21, '22. 

Taylor, Telford ; age 14. Schenec- 
tady High School, '24. Pasqua- 
ney, '20, '21, '22. Dana Junior 
Crew, '22. Long Walk, '22. 
Natural History Research 
Medal, '20. 

Townsend, William K. ; age 10. 
Pine Lodge, Lakewood, N. J. 
Pasquaney, '22. 

Tracy, Lawrence E. ; age 12. Brown- 
ing School, '28. Pasquaney, '21, 
'22. Third in Sub-Junior 25- 
Yards Swim, '22. Winning Jun- 
ior Baseball Team, '22. 

Tracy, W. Ward ; age 15. The Hill 
School, '26. Pasquaney, '19, 
'20, '21, '22. Winner in Canoe 
Tilt, '21, '22; Winner of Diving, 



'22; Second in Witherbee Black 
Obstacle Race, '22; Winner of 
General Excellence, '22. Birch 
Junior Crew, '21 ; Dana Exhi- 
bition Crew and Dana Senior 
Crew, '22. 

Vetterlein, Joseph R., Jr.; age 13. 
Haverford School, '27. Pasqua- 
ney, '22. Winner, Junior 50- 
Yards Swim, '22. Record One- 
Mile Swim, '22. 

Winpenny, J. Bolton; age 14. Fes- 
senden School, '23. Pasquaney, 
'18, '19, '20, '21, '22. Winner, 
Sub-Junior 25-Yards Swim, '18; 
Winner Sub-Junior Obstacle 
Race, '18; Sub-Junior General 
Excellence, '18; Winner, Junior 
50- Yards Swim, '20; Winner of 
Diving, '21 ; Third in 100- Yards 
Swim, '21, '22; Winner of Gen- 
eral Excellence, '21. Winning 
Senior and Junior Baseball 
Teams, '21. Long Walk, '21, 
'22. Cox., Birch Senior Crew, 
'20. Winner, Sub-Junior Tennis 
Singles and Sub-Junior Tennis 
Doubles, '19. 

Wood, Charles F., Jr. ; age 14. 
Louisville Male High School, 
'25. Pasquaney, '22. 

Woodward, J. G. Harper; age 12. 
Kalbfus School, Rochester, '26. 
Pasquaney, '22. 

Wurst, Perry E., Jr. ; age 13. Nich- 
ols School, Buffalo, '26. Pas- 
quaney, '22. 

Wyeth, Walter F., Jr.; age 14. 
Rivers School, '25. Pasquaney, 
'22. Long Walk, '22. 



go THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



CAMP RECORDS 



THE MOST FAITHFUL BOY 



1900 George Garrett 

1901 Chauncey Brewster Garver 

1902 Francis Gilman Blake 

1903 Eliot Carr Cutler 

1904 Roderick Beebe 

1905 Earle Trumbull Williams 

1906 Maurice Cary Blake 

1907 William Christian Bullitt, Jr. 

1908 Roger Sturtevant Kellen 

1909 Nelson Curtis, Jr. 

1910 John Norman Hazen 

1911 Benjamin Bullock, 3d 

1912 John McHenry, Jr. 

1913 Horace Tarr Cator 

1914 Thomas W. Proctor 

1915 James McHenry 

1916 John Gray Bolton 

1917 William Aaron Lippincott, 3d 

1918 Udolpho Theodore Bradley 

1919 William Stackhouse Scull, 2d 

1920 John Cranwill Thompson 

1921 Wallace Parks Ritchie 

1922 Eliot Codman 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



9i 



WATER SPORTS 1922 



GENERAL EXCELLENCE 
W. Ward Tracy 



SENIOR 



DIVING 
W. Ward Tracy 



100-YARD SWIM 
William F. Sanford 



OBSTACLE RACE 

(Witherbee Black Cup) 

Charles C. Clarke 



CANOE TILT 
A. Randell Lee, Jr. 
W. Ward Tracy 



CANOE RACE 
St'm. T. E. Hawes 

3 F. Mel. Galbraith 
2 C. C. Clarke 
Bow Donald Murchie 



JUNIOR 

50-YARD SWIM 
Joseph R. Vetterlein, Jr. 



CANOE RACE 

St'm. Edward j. Berwind 

Bow Daniel S. Codman 

SUB-JUNIOR 

GENERAL EXCELLENCE 
Edward H. Rakestraw 



25-YARD SWIM 
Edmund T. Hawes 



OBSTACLE RACE 
Edward H. Rakestraw 



DINGEY RACE 
John F. Lindsay 



Swimming Records 



HALF-MILE 
W. F. Sanford, 13:14 2-5 



ONE MILE 
J. R. Vetterlein, Jr., 35:02 



Winning Crews 


in 


Shell Rowing 


BIRCH SENIOR 








DANA SENIOR 


St'k T. H. Eliot 








St'k W. F. Sanford 


3 CD. Go wing 








3 W. W. Tracy 


2 E. Codman 








2 T. E. Hawes 


Bow A. R. Lee, Jr. 








Bow C. C. Clarke 


Cox J. W. Henning 


,3d 






Cox R. C. Berresfo 




Dead Heat. 


T 


ime 4: 


25 



BIRCH JUNIOR 
St'k G. A. Phelps, Jr. 
3 H. T. King 
2 D. B. Hinchman 
Bow G. Murchie, Jr. 
Time 3:07 4-5 



92 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



SENIOR 

SINGLES 
G. A. Phelps, Jr. 



DOUBLES 
G. A. Phelps, Jr. 
C. C. Clarke 
JUNIOR 

SINGLES 
I. L. Lee, Jr. 



DOUBLES 
J. R. Leonard 
E. H. Rakestraw 



TENNIS 1922 



SUB-JUNIOR 

SINGLES 
C. F. Stan wood 



DOUBLES 

C. F. Stanwood 
E. T. Hawes 



TENNIS SINGLES CHAMPIONSHIP FOR 1922 

won by 

George A. Phelps, Jr. 



RECORD CUPS FOR ATHLETICS 



BIGLOW CUP FOR SPORTSMANSHIP 
Walter H. Lillard, Jr. 



THOMAS HIKE CUP 
Donald Murchie 



HARVARD CUP FOR BASEBALL 
No award 



YALE CUP FOR ROWING 
Richard C. Berresford 



PARSONS CUP FOR HALF-MILE SWIM 
A. Randell Lee, Jr. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



93 



mub&lt&vzc 



Our Khmrtxsn& 

tyit&B? patronize our advertisers 
whenever possible. 

©Jj? following pages represent the 
genuine interest of many friends 
and patrons of Pasquaney. It is in 
a large measure due to their kind 
generosity that we have been able 
to publish the "Annual" in its pres- 
ent form. To them the Board is 
very grateful and feels that, to show 
its appreciation, the Camp should 
make whatever modest return it 
can. 

(§n? good turn deserves many 
others. 

THE BOARD. 






meal 



94 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



In memory of 

A True Friend of the Csmp 
M. i_. B. 



WE SINCERELY RECOMMEND YOU TO 

JOIN 

THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF 
AUDUBON SOCIETIES 

and take your full part in enjoyment and protection of wild bird life 



Send $5 care of T. Gilbert Pearson at No. 1974 Broadway, 
New York City, for annual membership, with subscription 
to i4 Bird Lore" and other advantages; or, better, obtain 
life membership by sending $100 for the endowment fund, 
as did this father and son. Also $1,000 constitutes a per- 
son a Patron, $5,000 a Founder, and $25,000 a Benefactor. 

JOIN FOR THE SAKE OF OUR AMERICAN BIRDS 

D. C. and J. B. C. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 95 



4- 4 

♦$• COMPLIMENTS OF •$* 

I THE ST. PAUL, MINNESOTA, BOYS } 

4* H. ML <& 

% E - W - R < I 



* 4* 

* 4* 
4* *$* 
4* * 

T COMPLIMENTS OF *$* 

* 4* 

I THE ROCHESTER, N. Y., BOYS $ 

& * 

I G. H, G. { 

4* W. F. H. * 

4. J. G. H. W. 5 

* 4* 

* 4- 
•*• ♦$♦ 

* 4- 
•$♦ •$♦ 
4* 



96 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 

SMITH'S BLUE SIGN GARAGE 

C. A. SMITH, Proprietor 
Lake Street BRISTOL, N. H. 

Prompt Service to Patrons of Camp Pasquaney 
and the Traveling Public 

GASOLINE AND SUPPLIES VULCANIZING 

BROWN & GOODWIN 

PLUMBING 

STEAM, HOT WATER, FURNACE HEATING 

A SPECIALTY 

dealers in STOVES, TINWARE and STOVE REPAIRS 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



97 




THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 

Ten Full Pages 

CONTRIBUTED BY 

Interested Patrons and Friends 
of Camp Pasquaney 






S^ 






98 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 

Members of CAMP PASQUANEY 

...FOR YOUR... 

GROCERIES 

HARDWARE 

PAINT, VARNISH AND 

CAMPERS' SUPPLIES 

...GO TO... 

CAVIS BROTHERS CO. 



SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SUMMER RESIDENTS 



You are invited to Make Our Store Your Headquarters when in Bristol 



5-6 CENTRL SQUARE BRISTOL, N. H. 

TELEPHONE CONNECTION 



PASQUANEY BOYS 

FOR VOUR CAMR SUPPLIES 
SUCH AS 

Moccasins, Goodyear Glove Tennis Shoes 

Bathing Suits, Jerseys, Sweaters 

Rubber Blankets 

And Everything Needed for Camp 

GO TO 

COX & BLAKE COMPANY 

CENTRAL SQUARE RRISTOL, N. H. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 99 



Zhc jf tret IWational Bank 

BRISTOL, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



ORGANIZED 1898 



CAPITAL, $50,000 



SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS, $45,000 



H. C. WHIPPLE, President 

WM. C. WHITE, Vice-President and Cashier 



Depositary for Camp Pasquaney 



IOO 



THE PASOUANEV ANNUAL 



WBBBBBBBBBBWL 



a,^ hT^r- KNh^h^- 



fig 

i 



THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 



THREE AND A HALF FULL PAGES 



FROM THE BOYS OF 



NEW YORK CITY AND ITS VICINITY 



R. 


C. 


B. 


J. 


B. 


C. 


P. 


C. 


2ND 


F. 


T. 


D. 


R. 


D. 


DE R. 


J. 


F. 




F. 


T. 


H. 


H. 


T. 


K. JR 


F. 


W 


. J. 



A. R. L JR. 
I. L. L JR. 
F. N. L. 
J. R. L. 
S. S. JR. 
W. K. T. 
L. E. T. 
W. W. T. 
E. S. W. 



]SQ3S<a^3j§ c 



ngcn &C2&G|U§GH§C 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



101 



miasm. 






jjecS^S^cSsfiiSKC 






THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 

THREE FULL PAGES 

CONTRIBUTED BY 

THE BOYS OF THE BOSTON PARTY 



R. B. Jr. 
J. P. B. 
G. W. B. 

C. C. C. 
J. A. C. 

D. S. C. 

E. C. 

S. E. C. 
S. D. 
T. H. E. 

F. M. G. 
C. D. G. 
R. B. G. 

W. F. W. Jr. 



F. A. H. 
J. B. H. 
E. T. H. 
T. E. H. 
J. H. Jr. 
T. L. J. 

W. H. E. Jr. 
D. M. 

G. M. Jr. 
C. M. L. 
N. P. 2nd 
H. S. S. 
C. F. S. 



W 



y&rpM 



'^S^S^^^S^S 



102 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 

W. H. BRINE CO 

27 Otis Street 
BOSTON - - MASS. 



©ffictal ©utfitters 

to 
Camp IPasquane^ 



ATHLETIC SUPPLIES FOR ALL SPORTS 

BASEBALL 

BASKET BALL 

FOOTBALL 

HOCKEY 

TENNIS 

TRACK 



W. H. BRINE CO. 

27 Otis Street, Boston, Ms 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



103 



They are not Keds unless 
the name Keds is on the shoe. 




<■;.•-: 



Shoes like the paws 

of a boy's best pal 




The world" a standards 



era/ outdoor wear. High 



CAN you run faster than your dog? 
Can you jump as high as a dog half 
your size? Examine your dog's paws some 
day. They are soft and springy. That's one 
of the reasons why he is so agile. 

With a pair of Keds your feet become 
as much as possible like the paws of a dog. 

Keds are built with 

— thick rubber soles, pliable, springy, 
protecting. 

— tough canvas tops, light and cool. 

— reinforcements where the wear comes. 

With Keds like these you will find you 
can run faster, walk farther, and do better 
in your sports and games. 

Wear Keds every day — in school and 
out. You will notice that many of the 
strongest fellows wear them from early in 
the spring until late in the fall. 



There are high Keds and low Keds and 
brown Keds and white Keds. You can get 
Keds with corrugated soles or smooth or 
suction soles — made of the finest rubber 
from our own Sumatra plantations. 

You can get the kind you wish at your 
dealer's. If he doesn't have them, he can 
get them for you. 

Look for the name Keds 
But remember, Keds are made only by the 
United States Rubber Company, the larg- 
est and oldest rubber organization in the 
world. If the name Keds isn't on the shoes, 
they aren't real Keds. 

Booklet, "Camping," sent free if you write 
to Dept. B-4, 1790 Broadway, New York City. 

United State: Rubber Cor.?any 



Keds 




104 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 





IMd&m 





» 




Corriplirnents of 

THE BOYS 

of 

HARTFORD, CONNETICUT 

P. V. B. 

R. C. B. 

C. C. G. 

G. fl. R Jr. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



i°5 




Frorn the 

KENTUCKY AGGREGATION 

U. T. B. 
B. D. H. 
J. W. H.. 3rd 
T. B. M. 

C F. W„ Jr. 



io6 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



cc 



ARCHIE" 

is opening a new store on 

magnolia 
avenue: 

DAYTONA, FLORIDA 

and NA/ill b>e there from 

November 1st to May 1st 

CALL AND GET 

"ARCHIE'S" 

Fudge that is 
FU DGEI 

Bridgewater, N. H. Daytona, Florida 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



107 



COMPLIMENTS OF THE 

OVERBROOK BOYS 



J. N. C. 


E. H. R. 


E. C. L, JR. 


J. L R. 


J. F. L 


C. C. T. 


T. M. 





^^Ss^^^^^^^^ggSS^eg^ 



io8 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 

Capt. CLYDE T. SMITH 

CANOES, ROW BOATS, POWER BOATS 

TO LET 



By this Day, Month or Season 



Spring Fishing a Specialty 



HEADQUARTERS PASQUANEY I IN l\J 
"TEL.. BRISTOL 105-5 

BRIDGEWATER IN EW HAMPSHIR 



THE HILLSIDE INN 



GEORGE S. SIS/NTH, Proprietor 



PASQUANEY LAK 



EAST HEBRON NEW HAMPSHIR 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 109 



&tyfyty&&fy&4fr&^fyfyfyfy&fy&ty&fy&ty4r^tyfyty^fy-fy-fy--fy-fy 


* 




•$• 


•$• 




* 


■$• 




•$• 


4 




* 


•*• 




* 


4- 




* 




COMPLIMENTS OF THE 




4. 


BOYS OF FAIRHAVEN, MASSACHUSETTS 


4 


* 




•*• 


•$• 




* 


4 


E. T. H. 


•*• 


•$• 




4. 


* 


T. E. H. 


•*• 


4- 


N. P. 2ND 


•*• 


•$• 




•#• 


•#• 




* 


* 




•*• 


4. 




* 


* 




* 






* 


44444444-$- •$••$••$••$••$••$*•$••$• •$••$••$• •$••$• •$••$• •$• *¥■■¥ -#••$••#••#• -4s- 


•*• 




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* 




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•$• 




•$• 


* 




•*• 


•$• 




* 


* 




* 


•#• 




* 


* 


FOR THE 


* 


•#• 




4. 




KENT SCHOOL 


4. 


* 




4- 


•#• 


COMPLIMENTS OF A KENT SCHOOL CAMPER 


•$• 


* 




•$• 


* 




* 


•#• 




* 


4. 




4- 


•#• 




^ 


•$• 




•$• 


* 




•$• 


•$• 




* 



no 



THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



D 8c M 

SPORTING GOODS 

Complete Outfits 

F"OR 

Base Ball Football Basket Bal 

Volley Ball "Tennis 



BATHING SUITS 

SWEATERS 

JERSEYS 

RUNNING PANTS 

ATHLETIC HOSE 




CARRYALL BAGS 

DUFFEL BAGS 

CANOE CUSHIONS 

BOXING GLOVES 

STRIKING BAGS 



\A/rite for Illustrated Catalog ana! 
Official Rule Books on All IVIajor Sports, FRI 



THE DRAPER. MAYNARD CO 

PLYMOUTH, IN. H., U. S. A. 

MANUFACTURERS 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL in 

C. W. COOLIDGE,jR. 

(general ilerdjattfttH? 

Souvenirs, Post Cards, Sporting 

Goods 

5-10-25r Ipparttttfttta 
BRISTOL, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Smith Shook and Lumber Co. 

Bristol, New Hampshire 



ii2 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



ESTABLISHED 1845 



GEO. W. WELSH'S SONS 
JEWELERS 

AND IMPORTERS 

213 BROADWAY oppose n . paul-s chapel NEW YORK 

NEW ASTOR HOUSE BUILDING 



COMPLETE STOCK OF 

Diamonds, Watches, Jewelry 

STERLING SILVER AND GOLD 

COLLEGE, SCHOOL, AND SOCIETY EMDLEMS 

MEDALLIONS A SPECIALTY 

PRIZE CUPS 



Designs and Estimates cheerfully rendered 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 113 



Thou Shah Do No Murder! 



To wastefully harm or destroy a 
tree is murder. 

Remember: "The Groves Were GocTs First Temples." 



WHEN YOU ARE COMING TO THE 
WATER SPORTS 

Call and see my ANTIQUES 



Granville F. Wheeler 

BRISTOL, N. H. 



ii4 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



Seal Estate and Insurance 

Steal Estate 

Real Estate Bought, Sold, Rented and Cared for 
on Reasonable Terms 

Jnattranre 

Fire, Accident, Steam Boiler, Employers' Liability and 
Indemnity Insurance 

Agent for American Surety Company, Issuing Surety Bonds of 

All Kinds 

J. P. HUCKINS 

TELEPHONE 120 PLYMOUTH, N. H. 



THE RECORD RRINT 

R. U. rVIcl—EIAISI, Proprietor 

111 Main St. 
PLYMOUTH, INI. H. 



A well equipped printing office employing 
skilled printers 

Professional and Commercial Stationery a 
spec ialty 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



"5 






THIS SPACE REPRESENTS 

THREE AND ONE-HALF PAGES 

CONTRIBUTED BY 

THE ST. PAULS SCHOOL BOYS 

PAST PRESENT AND FUTURE 



E. J. B. 2nd 
P. C. 2nd 
G. H. G. 

F. W.J. Jr. 
T. L.J. 

T. McK. Jr. 
T. M. 



W. F. S. 


!SC 


R. B. S. 




T. C. S. 


gg 


W. S. S. 2nd 


r& 


S. S. Jr. 




J. B. W. 2nd 


Wi 


J. G. H. W. 


m 









>&IP&fP&[ 



8 



ri6 THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



A. W. MOODY 

Photographer to Camp Pasquancy 
by Special Appointment 

... DEALER IN ... 

Kodaks and Kodak Supplies 

Send your Developing and Printing to me for 
Prompt Handling and the Best Possible Results 
from every film. Send me your orders for Last- 
man Film and Kodak Supplies. 

Telephone 8-2 BRISTOL, N. H. 



I Garry Everything That's Worth While in Photography 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



117 




"Good Instruction is Better than Riches." 

Cornpliirieiits of the 

WILLIAM PENN CHARTER SCHOOL 

Boys and Counsellors 

E. M. C. Jr. 
J. N. C. 
W. S. D. 
J. W. S. Jr. 
J. C. T. 



n8 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



VOLPE BROTHERS 


PLYMOUTH ISIEIW HAMPSHIRE 


Dealers in 


Fruits, Produce, Nuts 3nd 


Confectionery 


Special Attention Given 


Summer Schools and Oamp Orders 


Agents for 


Moxie, Boston Confectionery, New 


England Confectionery, Whitman's 


Candies 



BURTT'S STORE 

HAS 
Everything That Is Needed to Furnish the Home 

ALSO 

Building Material and 

Hardware to Build the Home 

Let us serve you 

A. F. BUKTT COMPANY 

Telephone 22-2 PLYMOUTH, N. H 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



119 









m£&\£m£&X£Ssi m f!c. 



& 

»# 


L. B. 2ND 


^ 


E. C. L JR 




J. F. L. 




E. LEB. M. 




E. H. R. 


% 





COMPLIMENTS OF 

THE HAVERFORD SCHOOL 

BOYS AND COUNSELLORS 



J. L R. 
J. R. V. JR. 
J. M. C. 
E. W. C. J. 
R. G. S. 



i2o THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



MOSES A. BATCHELDER 

<%. Clothing ^j. 

<%> Furnishings -& 

* * 

4 Boots and Shoess ♦ 

$> PLYMOUTH, NEW HAMPSHIRE <& 



4- * 

.$. -fa 

^ COMPLIMENTS OR ^ 

| NICHOLS, the: florist } 

<%> & 

* — and — * 
I GIFT SHOP t 

•£ PLYMOUTH, INEIW HAMPSHIRE •$* 

* f 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



121 



I 



oJ^€^ 



Fa 



FOR 

THE MONTGOMERY SCHOOL 

WYNNEWOOD, PENNSYLVANIA 

CONTRIBUTED BY 

A FRIEND 



I 



c_§g==§ri 



^3%g^' 



i22 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



THE PEMIGEWASSET 

PLYMOUTH, N. H. 

At the Gateway of the White Mountains, elevation 1000 feet. 
Near Lake Winnepesaukee, Newfound Lake, and Lake Asquam. 
130 miles from Boston. State road, 30 miles to Profile House, 40 
miles to Bethlehem, 50 miles to Bretton Woods and Crawford 
Notch, 100 miles to Dixville Notch. Four hours from Boston by 
train, four trains daily. 

All rooms en suite, baths, telephones, steam heat. Supplies from 
our own farm. Open June 15th to November 1st. 

W. F. ADAMS Proprietor 



COFFEY'S PHARMACY 

PLYMOUTH, N. H. 



Is Always on the alert to please its many 
patrons, being fully stocked at all times 
with its several specialties 



W. R. COFFEY Proprietor 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 123 

CORNING GLASS WORKS 

CORNING, N. Y. 



MAKERS OF TECHNICAL GLASSWARE 



BULBS and TUBING for Incandescent Larnps 

"PYREX" Transparent Oven Ware 

"PYREX" Chemical and Apparatus Glassware 

RAILROAD ILLUMINATING GLASSWARE 

THERMOMETER TUBING 

"CONZAS" (condenser lenses for moving picture service) 

OPTICAL GLASS 
and Light Filters of special absorption or transmission 

"CONAPHORES" (automobile headlight glasses) 

ARTISTIC COLORED "STEUBEN" WARE 



Maintains the Country's most important 
Research Laboratory in the Glass Industry 



124 TH E PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



X GREETINGS FROM X 

Jlansdowne poultryfarm{ 

^ ROUTE 1, BOX 1-O-S $> 



•9- 

•$• 
•*• 


LOUISVILLE, KENTUCKY 


* 
* 
* 
* 

* 
* 




S. C. WHITE LEGHORNS 
— arid — 




♦ 


WHITE 


PLYMOUTH 


ROCKS 


•*• 
•*• 










t 




HENRY LITTLE, Pres. 
E. A.CHASE, Treas. 




MIXED CARS 
A SPECIALTY 


■W 
* 



•$• R. M.CHASE, Secy. •?• 

| CHASE GRAIN COMPANY % 

^ Incorporated $. 

X Dealer in A 

* FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED * 



^. ANDPOULTRYSUPPLIES ^ 

<%> * 

•$• PLYMOUTH, INEW HAMPSHIRE * 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 












>a[£>S[£>SE>Sl2>S[oSl23^ E>§=[ 



M£m£&-< 



CONTINENTAL LEATHER COMPANY 



PHILADELPHIA 



MANUFACTURERS OF HIGH GRADE 



OAK SOLE LEATHER 



s%3 






\W&W&WZ!^^W&W&W&W^f 



m 

ML 

35§SDS<2SC 



i 2 6 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 

SHIPPERS and SELLING AGENTS 
HIGH GRADE 

Anthracite COAL Bituminous 

Fowler Coal Mining Company 



NCORPORATED 



366 MADISON AVENUE 
NEW YORK 



PACKARD DURANT 

JEarle G. Hntbon^ Trie. 

MOTOR CARS 



CALIFORNIA 


DISTRIBUTORS 


SAN FRANCISCO 




FRESNO 


OAKLAND 




BAKERSFIELD 


SACRAMENTO 




SAN JOSE 


LOS ANGELES 




STOCKTON 


1400 VAN 


NESS 


AVENUE 


SAN FRANCISCO 



THE FASQUANEY ANNUAL 127 




Funderburk, Smith & Mitchell, Inc 

1001 Commonwealth Avenue 
BOSTON MASS. 




128 



THE PASOUANEV ANNUAL 



Qgaogaas 



:& #c3 #cS 3 .'cS isSJ >?cS ^?£5 ^SJ i?£5 &3S3 #cS /?cS *?Q ^?^§ /?cJ /?cj i?cS *?c5 ^cO jz<5\ i?cS -?c3 *?£5 #cS ■■#& && -jz&} &(Ss -pjl 



ALBERT R. LEE & CO., INC 



NEW YORK 



m 

SQ1 



T. D. LEONARD 



170 BROADWAY 



NEW YORK CITY 






n$?# Hx?^ hp% -§c 



=^y. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



129 



MANLIUS 



z 
I 









To do his best work in his studies, it is vital that a boy should be happy 
and contented in his school life. His recreations should be so well ordered 
and supervised that he turns to his tasks with renewed resolution and energy. 
His surroundings should be beautiful and cheerful and his relations with his 
masters and comrades should be happy. The true military discipline, as 
evolved at Manlius, depends upon honor systems, manners and military cour- 
tesy to do away with hazing and rough school life, and this certainly makes 
for happiness here. A boy's character is built as much out of the school room 
as in it, as much through the close touch of our boys with our teachers in their 
daily experience and in their entertainments as in the study hall or lecture 
room. In the multitude of activities at Manlius we have something to interest 
every boy and the more he can be encouraged to get into this life, the better 
is his rounding out. 

A boy at Manlius takes his recreation and military exercises in a system- 
atic and progressive way so that his play hours may not be wasted and that 
he may the while learn better manners, build up a stronger body, become a 
better mixer and be ready to study harder when play hour is over. 

It is the purpose of the illustrated catalog to show how this is accom- 
plished and to present the story of the environments and associations with 
which we surround our boys. From its pages you will learn that ours is an 
earnest, businesslike and cheerful life and withal a wholesome and manly one. 

College Preparatory. Business Course. Junior School. 

Next term begins Jan. 3, 1923. 

Send for catalog to General William Verbeck, Box P, Mtemlius, N. Y. 



i 3 o THE PASOUANEY ANNUAL 



WEST & CO. 

1511 Walnut Street 36 Wall Street 

PHILADELPHIA NEW YORK 

CONSERVATIVE INVESTMENTS 

MEMBERS 
New York Stock Exchange 
Philadelphia Stock Exchange 




This Label is the fft^ HHD S5Rw\ I Identifying Mark 

' , | tf» buy er ^']ki^7vJ£' danpdxhj > 

on the Face of All <A^. ^^^^ j&ls Blabon Art Linoleums 



BLABON ABT FLOORS 

are quiet, resilient and comfortable to the tread. They are 
sanitary, easy to keep clean and economical to maintain. 
Blabon's "Invincible" Battleship Linoleum for hardest 
wear. Inlaid and Printed Linoleum for Office, Home, 
School, Camp or Bungalow, A pattern and a grade for 
every purpose. For Genuine Linoleum look for the name 
Blabon. Write for Illustrated Booklet. 

Till] GEORGE W. BLABON COMPANY 

PHILADELPHIA PENNSYLVANIA 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 131 



NATIVE POULTRY DRESSING PLANT SAUSAGE FACTORY AND SMOKE HOUSES 

49 NORTH CENTRE ST., BOSTON BLACKSTONE AND NORTH STS. 

CURING PLANTS 

BOSTON AND CHICAGO 



BATCHELDER & SNYDER CO 

Packers and Poultry Dressers 

Wholesale Only 




OFFICES AND STORES 
TELEPHONE RICHMOND 3000 



Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal, Pork, Hams, Bacon, Sausages 

Poultry, Game 

Butter, Cheese, Eggs, Olives, Oils 

Fresh, Salt and Smoked Fish 

BLACKSTONE, NORTH AND NORTH CENTRE STS. 

BOSTON, MASS. 



32 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 

TEL. RICHMOND 1463 OSMON C. BAILEY, Pres. 

Lowell Bros. & Bailey Co. 

FRUIT AND PRODUCE 



ME^^M 



69, 71, 73 CLINTON ST. BOSTON, MASS. 



BERMUDA— 8 DAV 
Vacation Tours $83 

And Up — Including All Expenses 

Longer Tours in Proportion 

All the attractions of a delightful yachting cruise to a Quaint Foreign Land. 

Cool in summer. — All sports. — Modern Hotels. — No Passports 

S. S. "FORT VICTORIA" S. S. "FORT ST. GEORGE" 

Sailing Wednesdays and Saturdays 

Send for Special Tours Booklet 

FURNESS BERMUDA LINE 

34 Whitehall St., N. Y. or any Tourist Agent 

ST. GEORGE HOTEL, Bermuda. Renovated and Refurnished. 
Finest Cuisine. Tennis. Golf. Swimming Pool. Bookings 
Furness Bermuda Line, N. Y. 



THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 133 



MNI>S"AY CHAPLET & MFG. CO. 



FOUNDRY CHAPLETS 



HARRISON BUILDING MARCUS HOOK 



PHILADELPHIA, PENNAi 



IV. G. WOOD & SOIVS 



NO. 1 PARK STREET, BOSTON 



SILVERSMITHS 

AND PRIZE MAKERS 



Haktra nf (Haas anb Meauhs for damp JJaaqwattpg 



134 THE PASQUANEY ANNUAL 



I 



JAMES W. BRINE CO 



1436 MASS. AVE. CAMBRIDGE, MASS. 

286 DEVONSHIRE ST. BOSTON. MASS 



^5=^ 



3fixit At\\ittxt (B00&B I 



FOOTBALL and BASEBALL 
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